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Joe Marconi

Do women really get quoted higher prices?

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An article in National Oil & Lube News tells about a recent study conducted by the Kellogg School for Management at the Northwestern University. The study found that women, who don’t appear knowledgeable about repair costs, may end up paying more money. The study was conducted in collaboration with AutoMD.com

 

They had men and women call for prices for a radiator replacement on a Camry. They concluded that women, although informed on the “market price” of a radiator prior, were quoted higher prices than men.

 

Is it me? There are more holes in this story and survey than a hunk of imported Swiss cheese!

What is the reason for this survey? How was it conducted? What shops were called?

 

Please, enough already with bashing repair shops. Do they really think that there are enough shops out there that are going to give prices over the phone? And, those that did, how can they give an accurate estimate?

 

Did all the men and women stick to the same script? And what the heck is “Market Price.” What are well selling, Striped Bass off the docs at Montauk Point?

 

I never conducted a survey, but know a lot of shop owners, and I can’t see shops around the country quoting women higher prices than men! Are there are few bad apples? Probably. But there are bad apples everywhere.

 

Let’s have a survey on how many shop owners and techs stayed late on a Friday night to make sure a soccer mom had her minivan ready and safe for Saturday’s game!

 

Here’s a link to the article. It’s short. Please read it and tell me how you feel.

http://www.noln.net/article/august-2013/study-women-quoted-higher-prices-auto-repairs-more-successful-negotiating

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