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5 Star Auto Spa

How would you handle this situation

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About a month ago one of my newer general service techs ended up doing an oil change on a vehicle and did not fill it with oil and pulled it out. The customer ended up going down the block and had to stop the vehicle and call us. We told him to wait where he was and NOT to drive the vehicle and we would send a technician out to where he was located. He ended up driving the vehicle back to our shop. Our lead technician poured oil into the vehicle but noted that there was a ticking noise that sounded like it could be from driving the vehicle with no oil. Instead of trying to piece meal the repair, we decided to buy the customer a replacement engine with the same mileage that the vehicle had when it came for the initial oil change. We ended up replacing the engine and verifying that the sound was gone before returning the vehicle back to the customer. That happened about a month ago and just a couple days ago the customer called in stating the vehicle is over heating. From the way he spoke on the phone and interacting with this customer, it seems as though he believes anything that goes wrong with the vehicle, even if it is not related to what we replaced, should be covered by us. I know we made the initial mistake (that tech is no longer with our company), but I feel as though we have done our due diligence to give the customer back the vehicle in the same condition he brought it to us. Do we continue to fix this customers vehicle? Do you tell him that we have done everything we are going to do? How have you or would you handle this type of situation?

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