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Joe Marconi

Beware Of Second Opinions

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We got a call the other day from someone who asked us if we would give her a second opinion. The car was at another shop and she wanted to know if the diagnosis on the steering rack was correct. She actually wanted us the give a price and make the diagnosis on the phone based on the notes from the shops work order. We have been down this road before and we are VERY cautious on how we handle this.

 

I dont know how you feel, but when someone doesnt trust another shops diagnosis, it makes it very awkward for us. We want to get all the facts and try to drill down to find exactly why the customer does not trust the shop.

 

In this case, after a series of questions from my service advisor, we found that the callers brother-in-law checked the car before bringing it to this shop and he said the pump had failed, not the steering rack. The brother-in-law works in construction.

 

Seeing where this was going, the service advisor insisted on having us look at the car before any second opinion is given. He also said that he was inclined to believe the other shop, not the brother-in-law. She said she would call us back to make an appointment.

 

My guess? Shes probalbly calling other shops right now.

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