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Junior

J2534 Passthrough Programer

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I'm looking at expanding our ability to update software on more vehicles. The tool I currectly have only has support for most Asian makes. As it is J2534 compatable it may work with others but I don't want to risk bricking a customer's ECU due to not having the correct tool. Looking at buying a Drew Tech tool. Wondering who is doing this work, have you seen a return on your invetment in this type of tool. What kind of tool are you using. How often do you do a software update and what do you charge for it?

 

We have only run into a handfull of scenarios where a software update repaired the customer complaint. I'm a little concerend about spending a few grand on a fully equiped tool that may not generate new business. At the same time I feel the need to have the tool in order to avoid sending the repairs that require updates to the dealer.

 

You thoughts and comments?

 

thanks!

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