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Joe Marconi

Costco, BJ’s Wal-Mart ,etc. a Factor in tire sales?

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Years back when Costco and BJ’s opened in my area, many people flocked to these places and I had a noticeably drop in tire sales. However, thru the years, those big box stores have not had any impact on sales. In fact, people have told me horror stories about the experience, plus they cannot perform the alignment, they cannot do a complete inspection and to go back to them for their free rotation is not worth the time and effort. It’s not to say the Costco, BJ’s and Wal-Mart does not sell tons of tires, but their customers are not mine, thankfully.

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