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Joe Marconi

New Car Dealer Shows True Colors

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About a month ago a 2004 Dodge Van came to us with an intermittent stalling problem and hard start. There was also a message on the dash, “NO BUSS”. The Diagnosis, after lengthy testing; failed PCM.

 

We ordered a new computer, which could only be purchased from the local Chrysler dealership. We installed the computer (a reman by the way) entered the vin ID and the van started right up, no problem. After a minute the engine began to run really rich, as if the engine was dumping too much fuel.

 

I want to keep this story short, because we went nuts on this Van. After 4 hours on this Van, my lead tech and foreman asked me to help. They updated me on what they did and all the tests they performed. I suggested going back to basics and start from the beginning again. Well, after an entire day of working on this Van, I concluded; “We have a bad PCM”. I know this is rare, but I was confident.

 

We called the dealer parts manager, he said “Ok, I will order another one”. Two days later we installed the new PCM and the Van ran fine, no issues, and is still running fine now.

 

I asked the dealer if he would help us on this, maybe check to see if we can get a little labor back or a credit in good will. The parts manager said he would find out. The other day, the parts manager told me he could do nothing and is charging me for both PCMs and there is no way the dealer was going to pay labor.

 

We all know that the new car dealer is not my first choice, but I have been buying from this particular dealer for the past 32 years. After many discussions, they flat our refused to help in any way.

 

This is not over, and I am not sure what I going to do. One thing I do know, I will NEVER buy another part from this dealer again!

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