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Joe Marconi

Are Cars Getting Too Old?

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The average age of a car in U.S. is now 11.3 years old. We service many cars and light trucks that are well over 12 years with better than 250,000 miles on the clock. Within the past few weeks we personally condemned 3 cars, which leads me to think that many of the “oldies” are ready for the scrap yard.

 

What are other shops seeing?

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