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German shop Owner, of just 18 months...


RyanGMW

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Hey everyone-

My name is Ryan Gangemi and I own a German auto repair business (BMW/Mini/VW/Audi/Benz/Porsche only). We started out small in a private location and moved into a commercial building June 1st 2011.

I'm a 30yr old BMW Master Technician and I run the shop myself while my wife does our books from home. I have 2 employees, one is a Mini Cooper master tech and another is our apprentice technician who does a lot of custom work (engine swaps, suspension/brake custom work, ect).

We are adding another tech to our staff soon with over 20 years of tech experience and service manager experience.

I have been browsing through the forums and it looks like there is a plethora of useful information here.

We have been booming lately, with over 650 new customers in the past 18 months. Business has been better over the past 2 months than ever before, and word has spread quickly in our town about us and we just keep gaining steam.

I look forward to learning lots from other board members and I hope to help where I can as well.

 

Our website is http://www.ryangmw.com/.

 

See you guys around!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi RyanGMW! Welcome to the site!

I am rather new here... but I couldn't help but respond. It's such great news to hear an auto repair shop that's going 'gangbusters'! Keep it up! The only comment I would like to make is this. I know you're busy. I know you've got a lot on your plate. But make the effort to start working on your customer retention, customer referral programs and stuff like that.

 

SooOOooOooo many times, shops call me looking for that 'quick fix'. You know... just the good stuff in marketing that works fast! Yeah. No such thing. Maybe that Unicorn can help them.

 

Don't get caught in the trap of not marketing. I am not wishing or hoping a change in your fortune. But don't wait until you need it. Get a system in place now. You can always 'turn it down'... or 'crank it up'.

 

Hope this helps! Good luck!

 

Matthew

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Hi RyanGMW! Welcome to the site!

I am rather new here... but I couldn't help but respond. It's such great news to hear an auto repair shop that's going 'gangbusters'! Keep it up! The only comment I would like to make is this. I know you're busy. I know you've got a lot on your plate. But make the effort to start working on your customer retention, customer referral programs and stuff like that.

 

SooOOooOooo many times, shops call me looking for that 'quick fix'. You know... just the good stuff in marketing that works fast! Yeah. No such thing. Maybe that Unicorn can help them.

 

Don't get caught in the trap of not marketing. I am not wishing or hoping a change in your fortune. But don't wait until you need it. Get a system in place now. You can always 'turn it down'... or 'crank it up'.

 

Hope this helps! Good luck!

 

Matthew

 

Couldn't agree more with this post, It's so true...Marketing is key

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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