Quantcast
Jump to content


AutoZone Moves Around the Corner from me


Recommended Posts

Requests for you to install customer supplied parts will increase. Your parts prices and labor estimates will be compared from the information from the parts stores. The parts stores will even steer repair requests to shops.

 

It pays for all of us to be nice to the parts suppliers in our area.. B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Autozone here is about 2 miles from my shop and are great to deal with. The store manager is one of the nicest men I have met and has given me banners to hang up in the shop, parts lists, stops by weekly to give me the store specials, refers me customers etc...

 

In my area Autozone is also the only game in town that will pay you the labor when you have to warranty out a part. They also have changed many of their parts brands to improve quality on alternators, starters, brake pads etc...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have an Oreilly's and Advance within a mile of the shop. The vast majority of the parts come from Oreillys. In fact, I am probably the biggest account in our town that Oreilly's has (pretty proud of that fact for being one of the youngest shops in the town). The guys at oreilly's send me a lot of business and a take every opportunity to return the favor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So who are these stores catering to? I can’t believe that there are that many Do it Yourselfers in the area. But I could be wrong.

Let's see, they aggressively market the free check engine light "diagnosis" (we all know that routine, diagnosis by shotgun). They have the "Loan a tool" program and now I see they offer free online repair information. So they sell the parts, loan the tools and provide the repair info for free. They are actively and aggressively working to eliminate the DFM profession, competent repair shops.

 

I had a customer with a 3.1L Grand Am set an appointment for an oxygen sensor because, "That's what the code said it needed." What code? "The code they read at the parts store." What code? "I don't remember, they said needed an oxygen sensor." So I started it up to pull it into the shop. It started HARD, blew black smoke and stumbled and misfired. I grabbed the scanner and checked data, O2 stuck above 950 mv, fuel trim -30, code was P0172 Fuel System Too Rich, well DUH! I asked him if he wanted me to put the O2 sensor in, or if he wanted me to fix the problem. He opted to let a professional actually diagnose and fix the car. So I put a fuel pressure regulator on the car, test drove it and verified the O2 switched fast and full scale and fuel trim was within -5 to 5. But they told him it needed an oxygen sensor.

 

My biggest problem with AZ is that if I were to buy a Duralast part I don't know whose part is in the box. Sure you cna say that about NAPA, CarQuest, etc. but if I order an ignition control module and it's a Wells product that may not even make it out of the driveway, or a wheel bearing that may be a Timken and will outlast the OE, how do you know? You don't know. And as long as it is a private label you don't know if they changed suppliers. And with their claim to fame being cheap, what is the incentive to keep the good part after they build their aftermarket professional customer base? I looked up a clutch for a Honda Prelude, there were two listed, one was $99.99, and the other was $199.99, both were Duralast and both offered 12 month warranty. What's the diff? I've also looked up parts and had AZ be more than the two "professional" parts store I primarily deal with. Example, Specta Premium radiator, I don't remember the specific vehicle. My cost from AZ was almost the list price from NAPA for the exact same part number.

 

As for Advance Auto Parts, no thank you. Shortly after I first opened I used them because of their lifetime parts warranty, trying to provide value to my customers. First failure was on a V-6 Mustang, I did four wheel brakes, pads, rotors and calipers. The new set of semi-met pads on the front wore a groove in the rotor, like an old LP record, and caused a horrible squealing noise. I was paid $25.00 to diagnose and replace the faulty brake pads AND the damaged rotor. The following year, same car rear axle, one of the brake pads delaminated and lost the friction material. The other three pads were at 90% or better and I was told that it must have been a defect with something else in the brakes. The whole set up was new the previous year from AAP! No warranty. No thank you. The last straw was an '03 Trailblazer alternator. 27 days after install the truck comes back on the hook, not charging, alternator is bad. So I got to test the system, replace the alternator again and pay the tow bill, for what, .5 hr at $25.00/hr. No thank you, NEVER again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By carmcapriotto
      Thank you to our friends at RepairPal for providing you this episode. As shop owners we were part of RepairPal’s Certified network and you can learn more at RepairPal.com/shops.
      Show Notes
      Introduce the article and the 2 options of marketers with an explanation of each Talk about They Ask You Answer Meeting face-to-face and the overall relationship In person vs Zoom Industry events Most locals meet over zoom now anyway Industry knowledge As generalist we had to learn a new client each time Terminology, acronyms. How they make money Auto body shops for example It did make us better marketers Generalist tech vs specialist tech analogy Knowledge about your local area Hot august night Road closures The words you use - pop vs soda, “northshore” Overall results A little subjective There are some great generalists out there We know what works for auto repair It’s like pattern failures on cars for specialists shops Comfort first story The dumpster rental company story  
      How To Get In Touch
       
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      The Weekly Blitz is brought to you by our friends over at Shop Marketing Pros. If you want to take your shop to the next level, you need great marketing. Shop Marketing Pros does top-tier marketing for top-tier shops.
      Click here to learn more about Top Tier Marketing by Shop Marketing Pros and schedule a demo:https://shopmarketingpros.com/chris/
      Check out their podcast here: https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/
      If you would like to join their private Facebook group go here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/autorepairmarketingmastermind
      In this podcast episode, Chris Cotton, an auto repair business coach, emphasizes the significance of building relationships with stakeholders in the auto repair industry. His spouse, Kimberly, is highlighted as a key stakeholder, illustrating the personal connections involved in the business. The episode also features a mention of Brian and Kim from Shop Marketing Pros, acknowledging their sponsorship and likely contribution to the industry through marketing expertise.
      The importance of connecting with stakeholders (00:01:18) Discussing the crucial aspect of connecting with stakeholders in an auto repair business, including defining stakeholders and the reasons for engaging with them. Benefits of holding meetings outside the shop (00:03:47) Exploring the advantages of conducting stakeholder meetings outside the auto repair shop, such as minimizing distractions, creating a neutral ground, and sparking creativity. Ideal locations for stakeholder meetings (00:04:57) Suggesting various locations for holding stakeholder meetings, including coffee shops, conference room rentals, restaurants, and co-working spaces. Structuring effective stakeholder meetings (00:06:54) Outlining the importance of having a clear structure and agenda for stakeholder meetings, including setting objectives, prioritizing topics, and assigning time slots. The impact of regular stakeholder meetings on business success (00:10:15) Highlighting the significance of holding regular stakeholder meetings based on research findings, such as achieving business goals and improving satisfaction and performance levels.  
      Connect with Chris:
       
      [email protected]
      Phone: 940.400.1008
      www.autoshopcoaching.com
      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
      AutoFixAutoShopCoachingYoutube: https://bit.ly/3ClX0ae
       
      #autofixautoshopcoaching #autofixbeautofixing #autoshopprofits #autoshopprofit #autoshopprofitsfirst #autoshopleadership #autoshopmanagement #autorepairshopcoaching #autorepairshopconsulting #autorepairshoptraining #autorepairshop #autorepair #serviceadvisor #serviceadvisorefficiency #autorepairshopmarketing #theweeklyblitz #autofix #shopmarketingpros #autofixautoshopcoachingbook
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • Water Proof And Self Adhesive
    • By DUFRESNES

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.



  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...