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Remote Starts

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Here are three questions for our participants:

 

1)Do you install remote starts?

 

2)Have you ever installed remote starts?

 

3)What do you think are the pros and cons?

 

 

What prompts this thread is that we have a negative opinion due to the problems we have saw out of remote starts with security systems. However, at this time of year I have 2-3 inquiries daily about these. There is a automotive electronics store 6 blocks from us that installs these.

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