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Iquitos, Peru S.A.

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I just got back from a 10 day trip to Iquitos Peru in the Amazon Jungle. I am going to post a few things as I have time. This is not video that I shot but I think you will find the mode of travel to be of interest. Iquitos is a city of 500,000 that can only be reached by water or air. No roads lead to Iquitos. 90% of the travel is either by three wheel motocar or by motorcycle.

 

 

Iquitos Motocars

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