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Joe Marconi

9/11 Remembered, Never Forgotten

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9/11 Remembered, Never Forgotten

 

Today marks the 10th anniversary of that tragic day, when terrorists planned a viscous attack on America. It’s hard to believe it has been 10 years already. Being born and raised in New York, I watched those towers being built, I watched in horror when they fell.

 

The only good that came out of that day was the unity that brought an entire nation together. Political differences were set aside and we, as a nation of free people, collectively came together and shared in the pain. I have not seen such unity before that day and I am sad to say that I don’t see a lot of today.

 

It shouldn’t take a tragedy such as 9/11 to realize that we are livening in the greatest country this world has ever known. We have brave soldiers that have been fighting the war on terror for nearly a decade. They fight this war, as others have fought wars before them, to preserve our freedom and rights. Let us never forget those that sacrificed so much.

 

I hope everyone displays the American Flag today, wherever you may be. Show the people of the world that this great nation is, first and foremost a nation of free people, dedicated to the preservation of all the things that make America great.

 

God Bless America!

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