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My name is Uzek Susol, I live/work & have grown up on Orcas Island Washington.

I started tearing apart lawn mowers & cars in my grandpa's back yard as far back as I can remember, quit school at 17 (couldn't stand sitting listening to things that didn't stimulate me) & went straight to work in an auto repair shop.

When I was 22 (1990) I opened my own shop, started with $5,000 & a rented 2 bay shop, in 2000 I bought commercial property & built my own 8 bay shop with 4 ASE technicians, a service writer & a 24hr Towing/Roadside Service, we recently became a Napa AutoCare Center.

I find myself happy working & making good money in a beautiful location but having a hard time finding time off & watching my kids growing up way too fast.

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