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In my opinion, competition is actually good for the industry, and good for your repair shop too.  It keeps us focused and forces us to maintain pace with other repair shops.  It drives us to take a look at our own business to see where and how we can make improvements.

Don't worry about the competition.  And never compete on your competition's features. Find what sets you apart; your differentiation factor.  Deliver world class service and promote your culture to your employees.  

So, how do we handle the competition?  Learn from them, but don't copy them.  Become the best you can be.  Promote a culture of customer caring with your employees. The rest will take care of itself.

Your thoughts?

 

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