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We are trying to come up with a bonus program to include our estimators, office staff and parts employees. I think it would have to be structured differently for each but I am not sure what to base the bonuses on. Any ideas?

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  • 2 weeks later...

We are looking at the same idea. We feel it is a team program all doing a great job to provide the best experience for the customer. We are all on salary & trying to increase our profits with new customers & retain existing. So I have tried to think of away to come up with a benchmark that say last year in the first quarter we did xxxx amount of sales this year we increased it buy 7000.00 so the group gets a part of that to split. My issues is A, just because we sold 7000.00 more don't mean our profit was much higher. This shouldn't be so tough I'm sure other shops have a plan that works & how do you back up showing your numbers when the employee says oh I know we made more than that without showing your finical. I have thought running off our profit & loss sheet but then get expense in there taken out like a new piece of equipment that the service advisor complains it should have been figured in because they don't use the machine.

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