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Do you know WHY your business does what it does?


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Reading a book and it mentions that most businesses know WHAT it does and even HOW but rarely WHY. 

For ex: early 1900's railroad companies prosper and the whole landscape of America is changed. WHAT it does is make railroad tracks and the how is obvious. 

But when Airplanes came along, all the railroad companies failed because they were so situated on WHAT they were (a railroad company). But if they went back to the WHY, they could have thought themselves as a mass transportation company and it would have been natural to adapt to changes in the mass transportation industry (airlines).

I thought long and hard WHY my business does what it does and why I started this company and this is the text I sent to my employees:

"Hey guys. We are in a saturated and competitive industry and I've always strived not to be competitive but to dominate and in order to do so, we have to do something totally revolutionary and different than the rest of the industry. With our name being CarMEDIX, I have come to the conclusion that we should see cars as an extension of the owners family.

I have been quick to tell customers to give up on their cars bc of the cost they are having to put into it. But if you look at hospitals, no matter what the health condition, people will hold onto family and do whatever it takes. It is my belief that most people have sentimental value to their vehicles and are concerned about who is working on them and how it's being treated. When we are selling a ticket, if we use personified words such as healthy/unhealthy, I think it will have a great impact.

For ex, "Mr. Smith, we completed your courtesy vehicle health report and your brake system needs attention. In order to restore your brake system to 100% health, we would need to flush out the old fluid and provide it with fresh fluid to protect it from further damage." Something along those lines. (How can you say no to that?)

Also, if we can assure them by simply saying "we will take great care of your vehicle while it's here" I think that will go a long way. For those of us working on cars, if we treat every car like a family heirloom that is irreplaceable, I think that would make a huge difference in the way we do inspections (more hours/more $) and the way we fix them  (less comebacks).

I think as a company we should have a slogan and I'm thinking along the lines of "keeping your vehicle healthy" or "keeping your vehicle alive." Anyway, I am thankful for each and every one of you guys and sticking through the changes and it is my hope that whether your long term goal/future is carmedix or not, I hope that this opportunity will launch you to what your goals and future aspirations are and I will do everything I can to help. Hope everyone has a great evening."

Wondering if this makes an impact tomorrow with the quality of work, morale and sales. My thought is that it will

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Great Tire Deal

I think you will enjoy this:

https://jcrowcoaching.com/2012/04/04/preparing-a-roast/

Quote

Easter was the usual gathering time for four generations of the family, from great grandmother Nana down to her great granddaughter – a newlywed. The young woman was hosting the dinner for the first time, with the help of her husband. He watched as his new wife took out a large roast, carefully sliced off both ends, and placed it into the roasting pan.

“So, why do you cut the ends off like that,” he asked, curiously.

She smiled. “That’s Mom’s recipe,” she said. “I think it keeps it moist, because her roasts are always good.” The young man was still. “I’m curious. Let’s ask your mom why,” he said, grabbing his wife’s hand and jumping up to find his mother-in-law.

The two of them walked into the dining room, where they found the bride’s mother setting the table. “Mom, why do you cut off the ends of the roast?” they asked. The mother thought for a moment. “I don’t know. That’s how your grandmother always did it. So I did the same.”

The young woman then turned to her grandmother, who was helping her mom set the table. “Grandma? What’s the secret to cutting off the ends of the roast?” The grandmother stopped folding the napkins, then said, “Well, that’s the way your great grandmother did it, so that’s just the way it’s always been done.”

The four of them looked at one another, then together turned toward the living room where great grandmother, the matriarch of the family, was sitting in the rocking chair. “Nana,” asked the young woman, “I’m fixing the roast just the way you taught grandmother and she taught mom and mom taught me, but we’re wondering why we slice the ends off?”

Nana looked at the group, raised one eyebrow, and said, “because the darned roasting pan was too small!”

http://www.snopes.com/weddings/newlywed/secret.asp

 

I always saw myself as being in the business of helping people get to where they want to go. Have worked on  bicycles, motorcycles, car, trucks, buses, etc. Got to be that the main bread came from car repair so that has being the center of attention.

But if you ask me why I do what I do, the answer is simple, I enjoy getting to where I am going and therefore enjoy helping other get where they are going. I have been lucky enough to have traveled all over the world, and my mechanic skills help me and others along the way get to where we were going. Thanks for the post, it brought back some very sweet memories.

 

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15 minutes ago, HarrytheCarGeek said:

I think you will enjoy this:

https://jcrowcoaching.com/2012/04/04/preparing-a-roast/

http://www.snopes.com/weddings/newlywed/secret.asp

 

I always saw myself as being in the business of helping people get to where they want to go. Have worked on  bicycles, motorcycles, car, trucks, buses, etc. Got to be that the main bread came from car repair so that has being the center of attention.

But if you ask me why I do what I do, the answer is simple, I enjoy getting to where I am going and therefore enjoy helping other get where they are going. I have been lucky enough to have traveled all over the world, and my mechanic skills help me and others along the way get to where we were going. Thanks for the post, it brought back some very sweet memories.

 

You remind me of a friend that also owns a shop. He started because his goal was to help those in need and use his skills as a missionary abroad. I think he reminds of himself of that goal and he is very successful and I never see him down even if business is not going well for a season.

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That's one of the best things I've heard from a shop owner. I think you are absolutely right, Jay. When I had my shop, that's exactly the way we did things and the results were fantastic. I've always thought cars/trucks have energy attached to them. Not a soul, but something. Strange as it sounds, I honestly believe it's real. That said, taking your approach will definitely improve everything from customer "be backs" going down, RO increases and better morale...not to mention an increase in referrals.

Use the words "keeping your vehicle/car/truck HEALTHY though...not ALIVE. Think about it. It's a great approach. Best of luck!

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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