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Jay Huh

Do you know WHY your business does what it does?

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Reading a book and it mentions that most businesses know WHAT it does and even HOW but rarely WHY. 

For ex: early 1900's railroad companies prosper and the whole landscape of America is changed. WHAT it does is make railroad tracks and the how is obvious. 

But when Airplanes came along, all the railroad companies failed because they were so situated on WHAT they were (a railroad company). But if they went back to the WHY, they could have thought themselves as a mass transportation company and it would have been natural to adapt to changes in the mass transportation industry (airlines).

I thought long and hard WHY my business does what it does and why I started this company and this is the text I sent to my employees:

"Hey guys. We are in a saturated and competitive industry and I've always strived not to be competitive but to dominate and in order to do so, we have to do something totally revolutionary and different than the rest of the industry. With our name being CarMEDIX, I have come to the conclusion that we should see cars as an extension of the owners family.

I have been quick to tell customers to give up on their cars bc of the cost they are having to put into it. But if you look at hospitals, no matter what the health condition, people will hold onto family and do whatever it takes. It is my belief that most people have sentimental value to their vehicles and are concerned about who is working on them and how it's being treated. When we are selling a ticket, if we use personified words such as healthy/unhealthy, I think it will have a great impact.

For ex, "Mr. Smith, we completed your courtesy vehicle health report and your brake system needs attention. In order to restore your brake system to 100% health, we would need to flush out the old fluid and provide it with fresh fluid to protect it from further damage." Something along those lines. (How can you say no to that?)

Also, if we can assure them by simply saying "we will take great care of your vehicle while it's here" I think that will go a long way. For those of us working on cars, if we treat every car like a family heirloom that is irreplaceable, I think that would make a huge difference in the way we do inspections (more hours/more $) and the way we fix them  (less comebacks).

I think as a company we should have a slogan and I'm thinking along the lines of "keeping your vehicle healthy" or "keeping your vehicle alive." Anyway, I am thankful for each and every one of you guys and sticking through the changes and it is my hope that whether your long term goal/future is carmedix or not, I hope that this opportunity will launch you to what your goals and future aspirations are and I will do everything I can to help. Hope everyone has a great evening."

Wondering if this makes an impact tomorrow with the quality of work, morale and sales. My thought is that it will

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