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Insurance Company asking to see my parts invoice

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Dear all,

 

I have a question... we are a very reputable mechanic shop in Southern California.... we sometimes have to deal with insurance companies ( not extended warranty), and this is the first time I am running into this.. so I want to get your opinion and if anyone knows the law on this....I also want to note, I don't have anything to hide from them, I just disagree with anyone/any company that wants to see more than they are required to see...... We need to do a cat converter and O2 sensor replacement on an 2006 BMW X3 , long story short, customer put diesel instead of gas 6 months ago, and thank God I made a note that the cats and O2s might prematurely go bad due to this at that time.... now insurance approved the job.... they asked to see my parts invoice...... technically I have nothing to hide.. my local dealer gives me 25% off the list, and the estimate is based on the list price....

 

Question is, again, do they have a right to see my parts invoice that I receive from the dealer, and am I in the clear to sell it at list while I am getting a 25% discount....

 

Really appreciate any input..

 

 

Regards

 

E

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