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Hi guys, ive been a long time lurker and finally got around to opening my own place. We've been open a week now and our first day was great we had 3 customer show up, two of which converted to sales. Since then it though nothing seems to have happened, phone doesn't ring, no real walk ins. Granted I've only been in business a week and I know it takes time but my question is what was it like for you guys? When did you start getting at least a couple of calls a day? I have a website with autoshop solutions as well as adwords and SEO, Ive also done 3k mailers with mudlick that will be hitting homes this week, and Ive been distributing flyers on cars on my free time roughly 1k or so thus far.

Edited by Eurozone_Motors

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