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There is a proposed bill in Mississippi that would cap labor rates for collision shops. In my opinion, any bill that would regulate and/or dictate the maximum labor rate a shop can charge is s step in the wrong direction. In addition, as an industry we don't earn enough.

 

The Automotive Service Association (ASA) opposes this bill.

 

What are your thoughts on this?

 

Here's a link for more information:

http://asashop.org/mississippi-bill-would-cap-labor-rates/

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