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tirengolf

Shop Management Service

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I have just took the plunge and went with Mitchell Manager SE, this was a huge decision for me. I really like the QB financial part, my CPA uses it also. I have used QB for 17 years, I have just outgrown it. My decision with Mitchell was my salesman who has been fantastic, young guy named JMichael, he also has a tech guy named Dustin. These guys have really impressed me so far, they are professional and know the product. I actually told JMichael about some negative reviews with support from Mitchell, they assured me that will not be a issue , I call them and they call me back. I kid them about Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. I cannot say enough about these two guys so far they are top notch. I think Mitchell may have got the message, they even extended a 30 day get out deal. He advised me to lets just start with the basic management first , although I did sign up for the CRM for my commercial accounts . If all goes like I feel it will Bolt on will follow in the next few months. I end my year this month, we go live Oct 1. I am integrating with Quickbooks. If any of you guys have any TIPS and HELP with the Mitchell program I sure would appreciate you shortcuts and secrets. I know we will have a learning curve and hiccups and second thoughts. Any head's up advice that some of you guys experienced that you feel would help me and my brother with this changeover would greatly be appreciated. GOOD OR BAD. Again I really have enjoyed my short time here. There are some great guys on this forum with some serious knowledge of the business and I appreciate what you guys share. Have a blessed week. David

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