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Joe Marconi

Rust continues to plague cars in Northern states - time to sell rust proofing again?

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The damage from salt and other chemicals used on winter roads in the norther part of the country is reaching epidemic proportions. The body of the cars don't seem to be affected, but the undercarriage rot is a serious issue. Pick up trucks especially are prone to rust and rot. We see trucks with as little as 70,000 miles with serious frame rot, rusted through brake lines and fuel lines.

 

We have tried to sell rust proofing packages to customers with new cars, but with limited success. Aside from the increased sales with brake line and fuel line repairs, are any shops promoting rust proofing to their customer base, and how successful are you.

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