Quantcast
Jump to content


vbtoytech

Free Member
  • Content Count

    10
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

vbtoytech last won the day on September 24 2015

vbtoytech had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

3 Neutral

About vbtoytech

  • Rank
    Occasional Poster

Business Information

  • Business Name
    Lexus of Nashville
  • Business Address
    2010 Rosa L Parks Boulevard, Nashville, Tennessee, 37208
  • Type of Business
    Auto Body
  • Your Current Position
    Shop Technician
  • Automotive Franchise
    None
  • Banner Program
    None
  • Participate in Training
    No

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I started out as a technician in Virginia and I was a VSP licensed Safety Inspector for 3 years. The program has a lot of problems as you mentioned. Some places will put a sticker on anything. When you reject a sticker the customer is mad. When you require a repair for a sticker, that is almost always your best sales tool ever. I always felt good about making the roads safer. The price for an inspection is below what it costs to pay most technicians, but that was generally gained back in repairs to pass. I took issue with the dealership method of inspections. There was only
  2. Lexus dealership - Robinair machine is required equipment. We didn't use it for over a year. FWIW - I don't have first hand experience, but I was told that the evac/recharge procedure takes substantially longer than a 134 machine.
  3. vbtoytech

    vbtoytech

  4. In my automotive education program, I learned how to take an excessive number of daily breaks - that was about it. I was in a Toyota accredited program at a community college. ASE exams are so easy to pass (under 70% correct is passing) and the dealerships will hire anyone who knows how to change oil - the industry as a whole has low standards of qualification.
  5. Shop supplied uniforms would be a nice perk. At the Toyota dealership I was deducted ~$15 a month for Cintas uniform service. At the Lexus dealership the deduction was over $20 a month for Cintas uniform service. That was over the line for me, so I bought my own uniforms and got the payroll deduction stopped. I prefer to wash at home anyway, due to sensitive skin.
  6. Motivating the lowest paid techs to do the fastest services without making mistakes is certainly an obstacle. I have seen a quick lube bonus of $1 per car, in addition to hourly pay, increase speed in the quick lane. Also, spiffs on filters, wipers, etc can motivate a more thorough inspection, even if the spiff is a small amount - 50 cents to a dollar per item - all items that your hourly tech can install. As far as your example on a percentage on up-sell for other work...At my shop we don't have a quick service tech. A thorough check-over by an experienced tech doesn't take long and
  7. Limited audience here it seems. In order to do a Virginia State Safety Inspection to legal standards, 30 minutes would be a minimum. Generally, a lot of shortcuts are taken. The maximum allowable charge is currently $16. Where I work, the hourly rate is $135, the inspection fee is $15, and the technician gets .4 ($6.40 or more). It WOULD be a major loss for the shop EXCEPT that most customers want to do everything required to pass. We do a multi-point inspection on every car that is pretty much a state inspection - as all of our technicians are state inspectors. Very few rejections are
  8. I am a tech and I have to split my shop-topping hours with these no-mobile-phobia people. It would be nice if management required phones to be left in cars or lockers. We also have no internet controls, so ESPN and YouTube erode my paycheck on a daily basis. If it wasn't work they wouldn't call it 'work', they'd call it 'super-happy-fun-time' or 'skippidy-doo'.
  9. Your radio policy and practice of requiring daily feedback from your employees are great; clearly, you cannot correct a concern that you are unaware of and it is better to fix any concern sooner, rather than later. Aside from the annoyance of the stereo mismatch, I am diagnosed with ADHD and also have moderate hearing loss in my right ear; the last thing I need is more distractions and more noise. I am consistently turning 10 hours + per day and we are desperate for another technician, so I don't understand how radio privilege is more valuable than a highly productive tech. My options prese
  10. I worked for a large dealership group that went so far as to ban radios company-wide. In the 25 bay shop at Toyota we would have about 10 radios on - mixed stations/playlists. Unfortunately, there was no enforcement after the memo was issued. The guy next to me was really into metal - what a nightmare. I agree that it is a management issue. While I absolutely love my manager, she is hands-off when it comes to the shop. What is the best way to approach management when things are awry? The radios are not the only issue.
  11. Older topic, but shop radios have been an ongoing issue for me as a technician. I am ALL FOR listening to music. My objection is that there are usually at least 3 radios on in our small (10 bay) shop, each playing something different. It's like I have all the worst song mash-ups in my ears all day and I can't even think sometimes - not to mention it can interfere with noticing or diagnosing an abnormal noise. The other techs insist on playing radios (these are the same guys with their phones glued to their hand) and management is either totally unconcerned or unwilling to f


×
×
  • Create New...