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alfredauto

new tech advice needed

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I hired a new guy out of tech school. Nice kid, arrives on time, is polite. I understand he's green but willing to learn, and that's OK with me. Here's my issue; he's slow. It takes him 5x longer than normal to do anything. I'm not sure if hes nervous or what so I have been giving him basic jobs like used car prepping so hes not hurting the customers. Even basic detailing takes him way too long, like 4 hours to wash and wax a car with no buffing or any kind of paint restoration. Tires - forget it, 45 minutes each. How long do I wait before giving up? He does the job right but minimum wage is too much at his speed. I set reasonable goals he can't meet them. Frustrating.

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