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Joe Marconi

Holiday Schedule? Close or open?

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With Christmas on Thursday, the question when to close and open up is a tough one. Some shops are closing Christmas Eve, others the Friday after Christmas. I don't think there is a right or wrong answer to this. We all need to take the time and celebrate the holiday. But what are your thoughts and strategy?

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