Quantcast
Jump to content


Price Shoppers and Under Cutters


Recommended Posts

So how is everyone handling price shoppers.... Customer calls and wants a price on a "tune up". How are you handling that lead? I for one know I am one of the more expensive guys in town and I am kind of surrounded by just old filthy under cutter type of shops. The type of places that will buy a starter for 150 bucks and charge the customer 200. Seems like all price shopping situations I am going to lose on.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've stopped doing phone quotes and started asking for the appointment to see the vehicle. It either gets them in or saves wasted time writing an estimate for work you will never do. Either way you win.

 

do you just flat out tell them " i dont give estimates over the phone""

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What works for me... I answer the phone very friendly, energetic, upbeat and professional. I let them feel my positive energy through the phone. I quickly work to build rapport. After I build rapport and listen attentively, I then work to establish control of the conversation. (You will find Not all Phone shoppers are looking for the cheapest price . Some are trying to establish a price for their budget.) I then ask them how they came to the conclusion that they needed this repair. I then pre-qualify the phone shopper and ask what type of a price are they looking for? How long do they plan on keeping the vehicle. This is my information gathering technique. Based on the answer I formulate my response. If they say they are looking for the cheapest price, I then counter by saying "based on your answer You must not be concerned about Safety, quality or dependability. This usually flips the table over. I then let them know that we are not the cheapest in town nor the most expensive either. I let them know that we would like to take a look at the vehicle as so we can give them several price options. I let the price shopper know that we hire the best technicians available. We have a drug free workplace, we offer nationwide warranties. Same day service most repairs. How long we have been in business etc. All though this response is long. This all happens very quickly on the phone, based on the customers responses. 8 out of 10 times our professionalism and genuine care is felt through the phone in wanting to help them. This gets us the appointment to bring their car in. As a final note if forced in to a phone quote I give a range in price from low to high. We are often told they brought their car in to us because we were so nice on the phone !!! Not short and frustrated and making their call seem like an annoyance or interruption. This is how we win over people that call other shops before us. Remember people do business with people they like and can form a connection and mutual understanding !!! Respectfully Submitted, John. Hope this helps out fellow Shops !

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What works for me... I answer the phone very friendly, energetic, upbeat and professional. I let them feel my positive energy through the phone. I quickly work to build rapport. After I build rapport and listen attentively, I then work to establish control of the conversation. (You will find Not all Phone shoppers are looking for the cheapest price . Some are trying to establish a price for their budget.) I then ask them how they came to the conclusion that they needed this repair. I then pre-qualify the phone shopper and ask what type of a price are they looking for? How long do they plan on keeping the vehicle. This is my information gathering technique. Based on the answer I formulate my response. If they say they are looking for the cheapest price, I then counter by saying "based on your answer You must not be concerned about Safety, quality or dependability. This usually flips the table over. I then let them know that we are not the cheapest in town nor the most expensive either. I let them know that we would like to take a look at the vehicle as so we can give them several price options. I let the price shopper know that we hire the best technicians available. We have a drug free workplace, we offer nationwide warranties. Same day service most repairs. How long we have been in business etc. All though this response is long. This all happens very quickly on the phone, based on the customers responses. 8 out of 10 times our professionalism and genuine care is felt through the phone in wanting to help them. This gets us the appointment to bring their car in. As a final note if forced in to a phone quote I give a range in price from low to high. We are often told they brought their car in to us because we were so nice on the phone !!! Not short and frustrated and making their call seem like an annoyance or interruption. This is how we win over people that call other shops before us. Remember people do business with people they like and can form a connection and mutual understanding !!! Respectfully Submitted, John. Hope this helps out fellow Shops !

John- That was my style for 26 years until I had a stroke from doing 3 peoples jobs.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the most part, stopped giving over the phone estimates. If it's for maintenance type work ex. tune up, I'll just tell them it starts at $xxx depending on vehicle. If it seems like it's a high probability they will bring car in - I will price out for their vehicle and call them back with $ and get on schedule.

For the "how much to replace a thermostat" - type calls - I flat out refuse to give them a price. Need to see car - bring it in and we'll give an estimate. Most times I ask why they think they need the "thermostat" and their answer usually confirms for me that it isnt the repair that they need even though their father-brother-cousin-neighbor said it was what they needed.

I just got real tired of wasting my time pricing out jobs for people who wanted a price on an incorrect repair.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For tune-ups, I ask if they have had their spark plugs done, if the diff fluid has been replaced, what about a fuel induction service? Oh, and your cabin filter? Oh and one more thing, what about brake fluid? And do you know if you have ever had your coolant or trans fluid replace?

 

By this point, they usually get the point that we can't really give a price for a tune up over the phone. We NEED/HAVE to see the car to give an accurate price. If they persist, we price an oil change and tire rotation with a complete vehicle inspection.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe people call for a price because they do not know what else to ask. They want resolution to their problem. Its expensive to get the phone to ring, so EVERY call counts. Start be talking about their problem, and use open ended questions, which will cause them to tell you what is really going on. " why do you think you my need a tune up?". The answer to that will give you the ability to get them into your shop. They may say "well, my fuel economy has dropped, and my uncle said I need a tune up". You may answer that they might not need a tune up, it could be something simpler. If you show you want to help, and add some new information into the conversation, then you are controlling the conversation and the situation. Demonstrate you want to help, invite them down to your shop with some urgency, " i had an appointment cancell, so we have an opening at 2pm, or 2:30, which is better for you? Then give them directions and make a new fan. They just want to solve their problem, and price is probably all they know to ask. It a pretty easy to beat price hack type shops, price is the easiest, laziest thing to sell.

Edited by Shopcat
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Changing The Industry
      When A Customer Tries To Bring You Their Own Spark Plugs #carrepair
    • By carmcapriotto
      Matt Fanslow discusses the importance of understanding technicians' value, open communication about compensation, and collaborative problem-solving.
      Show Notes
      Dutch Silverstein - Straight Talk to Technicians [E018]: https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/episode/018 Dutch Silverstein - Straight Talk to Technicians - Part 2 [E046]: https://mattfanslow.captivate.fm/episode/046 Challenges Faced by Managers and Owners (00:01:30)  Demand for Better Compensation (00:02:43)  Assessing Value and Increasing Compensation (00:04:28)  Honest Conversations and Fear (00:05:54)  Hierarchy and Fairness (00:10:16)  Improving Communication and Grace (00:15:52)  Achieving Collective Success (00:18:12)  Recognizing Flaws in the System (00:19:28)  Taking a Step Back to Move Forward (00:20:58)  Accepting Criticism and Turning It into a Positive (00:22:05)   
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Autotech napaautotech.com
       
      Email Matt: [email protected]
      Diagnosing the Aftermarket A - Z YouTube Channel HERE
      Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By jadetrost
      Hello guys I’m Jade Trost 56 years. New  on this forum 
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thank you to our friends at RepairPal for providing you this episode. As shop owners we were part of RepairPal’s Certified network and you can learn more at RepairPal.com/shops.
      Show Notes
      My Facebook Ads are showing to people way outside of my service area (not set up right) My social media doesn’t seem to be providing a return on investment (Junk smm) I never see my Google Ads when I search for my business (low budget) I don’t show up in the Map Pack when I search for auto repair near me, and I’m searching while I’m in my business (connected to wifi) My website is too slow (pictures too big or cheap hosting) My website doesn’t come up when people search for mechanic near me (stock content) I get lots of leads but they don’t turn into customers (Your SA sucks) My marketing looks like every other shop’s marketing (are you talking to your marketers?) The shop is slow. It’s time to turn our marketing back on. (never stop marketing)  
      How To Get In Touch
       
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • Water Proof And Self Adhesive
    • By Changing The Industry
      Dealership Tries To Pull A Fast One


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...