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Funny Story from an unbelievably low class customer !

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So we have a customer come in with a 2010 X6. This is her second time here. Both times she walks in with a fur coat. Second time she brings her husband. Her husband notifies us that he is having issues with his battery/charging system. I explain to them that we would first like to perform a charging system test to ensure there is nothing else in the system that is in need of attention or repair. They agree and by all accounts seem like nice people. He even informs he has a 2006 M6 that he was interested in selling.

 

Fast forward 2 hours later, we call them back and let them know that they would be needing a new battery and the rest of their charging system looks to be working. We had told them to expect that the battery costs between $250-325 and there may be an additional IBS cable that is recommended to be replaced as BMW has released an updated version of said cable. Upon notifying the customer, he gets upset with the price and says, "Wow, I could have just went to the dealer." We tell the customer he more than welcome to come pick up the vehicle since we won't have his parts until Monday if he chose to perform the service.

 

Fast forward another 3 hours, the customer shows up (the wife). We see her pacing around outside on the phone as we are closing our roll down gate. My partner informs me the customer is outside and is probably coming inside the office. I wait 5 minutes and no one comes through the door, I find it odd so I go outside. She is no where to be seen and the car is gone.

 

We try calling them 3-4 times with no luck. She finally returns our phone call screaming saying we are irresponsible for leaving her key in her car and we are going to have to deal with her husband then hangs up. All subsequent calls are not answered.

 

In 8-9 years I've been doing this, I have never had this happen. These people looked like decent folks and seemingly were at least middle income. It amazes me what low class scummy people will do to get over. On top of that she had the nerve to try to make it our fault she stole her own car back LOL. I'm not going to go crazy over theft of service ($49.95).

 

Class has no appearance!!!

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