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TonyD

Here We Grow ! Ideas for shop layouts

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well i guess this is a good problem to have we have outgrown our current facility, we have been at this location goin on 20 years and we just need more room , and would like the asset of owning our own facility. currently we are running out of a 2300 square foot facility 3 bays. we are putting to gather a deal to purchase a property close by but we would have to bulid a shop on the site . the issues i have are they layout i know what i dont want. just want to bounce some ideas from guys that are in the trenches the architects cant relate to all the circumstances. that we encounter on a daily. what i a leaning on is not your "midas" style layout with six drive in bays i would like to use a more open layout about 4000 square feet . drive in from the side and have stalls on left and right and a drive threw door on the other side. my questions are if any of you are utilizing this type of setup any pros and cons to it . we hope the town will approve a footprint of 70x60 or 60X50 if the make us scale it back. my question are if any of your shops are similar to this do u have any issues with fitting larger vehicles ie trucks and vans, or work flow . also if you have recommendations of sources that may have designs that may be viewed or purchased . we are in the north east so winters are a factor right now we are entertaining block and or metal construction.

thank you guys for taking the time to view this post , Happy Wrenching!

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