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Joe Marconi

Shop Owners Need To Define Themselves

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John Wooden, the legendary basketball coach from UCLA, once said, “In my forty years of coaching, I never took a shot at the basket, never scored a point and never made a rebound. That was not my job”. John Wooden understood his role as a coach and the role of his players. We, as shop owners need to do the same.

For too many years I wore way too many hats. This notion that I, because I was the “Boss”, had to be the best technician, the best service advisor and essentially the best at all positions was ridiculous. This way of thinking leads to burnout and disappointment.

Learning your strengths as a leader is crucial. Knowing the strengths of others in your shop and helping them become better is a gold mine. Thinking that the world surrounds us and that we need to have our hands in every element of the business will lead to our demise. When the second baseman is not performing, the coach does not take his place on the field, he gets another second baseman.

Once we assume the role as business owner, our life changes. If we don’t clearly define our role and all positions in our company we will not succeed. Trust me, until I realized that it’s the people around me that leads to my success, I struggled daily.

Running a shop is not easy. It’s perhaps, one the toughest jobs out there. But it can be rewarding both financially and emotionally. Work on your role first, and then go to work making others around you better at what they do. Your happiness and the happiness of others depend on it.


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