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phynny

Oh Customers, Why So Clueless?

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So it seems I keep running into this same conversation (especially with company vehicles) and I'm wondering if it frustrates anyone else. I'll lay out an example of a real conversation.

 

cust: My van doesn't run right, it has no power.

me (after I scan it): There are a dozen codes stored in the vehicle, how long has the check engine light been on?

cust: A year or so

me: Well since so many sensors and parts have failed its going to be $950 to fix everything

cust: WOW WHY SO MUCH?

me: Because you have negleted the vehicle for over a year, if you would have brought it in when the light first came on we could have fixed the issues that caused more issues

cust: I just never have time

me: ...............okie dokie

 

 

And as you all know it can be a nightmare to troubleshoot a misfire when you have 7 codes that can directly cause the misfire. And the best is when some customers just want the misfire fixed and don't care about the codes and when you replace the first part and it doesn't fix the misfire they get all bent out of shape like it's my fault.

 

Charles

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