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Joe Marconi

Local Valvoline Not That Busy

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There is a local Valvoline Quick Lube near me that does not appear that busy. I wonder if it's just this location or are quick lubes going thru a change in their customer base? I know one thing that strikes fear in the quick lube industry is the extended oil change intervals and the fact that many people pay more attention to the maintenance light than actual mileage.

 

How are quick lubes around the country doing?

 

 

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