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Joe Marconi

Hunter Alignment Quick Check?

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I remember in the 70s working at a Ford dealership, every car that entered the service drive area had to run over the Bear Alignment check machine. After the car ran over the equipment, a big needle on the machine would let the service advisor and customer know if the wheels were out of alignment. The service advisor would then sell an alignment based on the findings.

 

Well, times have changed and that old machine may be outdated but not the concept. Hunter has its own version called the Hunter Quick Check, claiming it can check an alignment on a car in 60 seconds. It’s another piece of equipment, not part of your existing alignment machine. I understand the concept, but how can it fit into the average bay designed shop?

 

Does anyone own this equipment or know of anyone who does? Any feedback would be helpful.

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