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Joe Marconi

Lack of Harsh Winter Affects Business

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Here we are in January, and the winter in the north east, so far, has not been that bad. While most people are enjoying the mild winter, body shops and repair shops would prefer a more normal winter. It’s not that we want to wish the motor public bad things, but we could use a boost in business at this point.

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  • Similar Topics

    • By JeffPMR
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    • By AutoShopOwner
      As a growing number of states issue emergency orders to close non-essential businesses, the U.S. government has issued guidance declaring that automotive repair and maintenance are “essential” functions.     
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      A March 19 memo from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) includes automotive repair and maintenance employees in a list of “essential critical infrastructure workers.”
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      For additional information, contact Aaron Lowe, senior vice president, government and regulatory affairs, at [email protected] or Tom Tucker, director, state affairs, at [email protected]
      Source: https://www.counterman.com/automotive-repair-service-deemed-essential/


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