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Biff Tannon

Want garage keepers insurance for mobile mechanic?

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I am a mobile mechanic currently with safeco, but my local agent quit using them because their prices went up substantially.

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      Here’s a marketing idea I wanted to share with everyone. Auto shop owners and marketers are focused on targeting the local residential community. But what about all of the businesses that employ people who work in the area but don’t live in the area? These employees are all great prospects for auto repair services. The challenge is effectively targeting and reaching them. 
       
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