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Joe Marconi

Do You Call Around for Prices?

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I spoke to a shop owner the other day, someone I had not spoken with in a while. A discussion came up about part pricing and he told me he still calls 2 to 3 shops for most jobs to get the lowest price. Is this practice still done, given what we know today about productivity, price stratedy and loyalty to our suppliers? I did not want to get into a debate with him, so I let it go.

 

I would like to hear from shop owners about this.

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