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Alex

Bimini Fishing Trip Photos

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I went on a fishing trip last weekend to Bimini, Bahamas. We flew down to Ft.lauderdale from New Yorg LGA and took a prop plane to the island. Great time, did some deep sea fishing and bone fishing...Bimini is known for shark infested waters! if you like to fish, this is a a prime place to fish! Below are some pics...

 

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