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Joe Marconi

Charging Extra for TPMS and Servicing the TPMS Sensor?

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I was at a TECH NET meeting the other night and a discussion started on charging extra for mounting and balance new tires with TPMS. I was a little surprised to find that most shops don’t charge extra because they don’t rebuild the sensor by replacing the seal, core, retainer nut and cap. Most just let the air out, dismount and mount tire, put the core back in and that’s it. They claim that is only causes more issues and they can't charge for it becuase it adds too much more to the tire sale.

 

I stock most of the TPMS kits and remove the sensor, replace the seal, the core and the cap when we sell a set of tires. I feel it’s the right way to do the job. We explain to the customer beforehand about the TPMS and also inform them that sometimes the sensors may need to be replaced if the core or retaining cap is seized.

 

What are you doing in your shop?

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