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Joe Marconi

Treat Your Part Suppliers With Respect

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We all know all too often the frustrations of dealing with your local part suppliers at times; wrong parts, defective parts, delayed deliveries, on and on. Although it may appear as if there is a conspiracy, I don’t think they intentionally want to do your business harm.

 

The fact is we need our part suppliers and we need on-time deliveries. Productivity equates to profit and having the right part delivered in a timely manner is critical.

 

We started a policy to be respectful and courteous over the phone to all parts counter people and to the drivers. We make a little small talk and make sure we thank the drivers for the fast service. You be surprised how people react to a little humanity for a change, after getting beat up all day.

 

Think of it this way….if your shop stands out because you’re known has the “nice guys”; I promise you if there are 2 deliveries going out at the same time, your shop will be the first stop.

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