Quantcast
Jump to content









California accuses 22 Midas shops in 'massive' bait and switch scheme


Recommended Posts

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 6 months later...

This type of headline is never good news for any of us:

 

California accuses 22 Midas shops in 'massive' bait and switch scheme

 

Personal finance news, advice, calculators - WalletPop

UNBELIEVABLE ! ! ! 22 shops ... all playing the same scam??? What's wrong with this picture... this sounds like upper management stuff... I'll bet it was some sort of policy that was made into standard practice and now it's caught up with them. Seems like the idea of "over selling" may have been a great idea at the board meeting, but not such a great idea in the repair shop... There again.... it's that same old saying I keep hashing out ... when common sense leaves.... STUPID... takes it's place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, the followup story says the same guy owned them all that would explain the 22 stores.

that's what I meant by upper management.... some goof ball thought he could get away with it... and all he really was .... was a crook.

22 stores... this guy had a few bucks to start with.... why in the world did he think he needed to rip people off...???

My bad, I'm not that rich... so I guess I'll never understand... LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This goes beyond overselling...this is stealing. Plus, it make us all look bad, that's my fear.

Joe, this is another issue we talked about before... advertising..... the more money you can put out for "false" leaders, the more the unsuspecting general public gobble it up as true facts. To bad there isn't anything in place to insure that only true factual advertising can be produced. Good luck with that.... I guess my point is... some how some way the industry needs to police itself and let the general public know that it ain't "US" but some crack pot with cash to burn and who then turns it around and burns them...

 

Pisses me OFF... to hear about these type of bait and switch con artist tactics. Hell, I ain't perfect, but I don't mislead customers with false repairs or lies.... that's just wrong.! ! Mistakes happen and that should taken in to consideration.... but, as all of us know, when a mistake happens in the shop the customer automatically puts you-me-and the whole industry in that same catagorey as this guy from Midas.... sucks... hate it... makes me want to quit every time I think about it.

 

You know, every voice counts.... maybe this website is the start .... maybe we really can make a difference for the future techs, shops, and the industry as a whole.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

This type of headline is never good news for any of us:

 

California accuses 22 Midas shops in 'massive' bait and switch scheme

 

Personal finance news, advice, calculators - WalletPop

 

OK guys, I have to admit that this story not only alarms me, it makes me more than a little PO'd. This is liable to get a little long winded but please bear with me while I explain.

The bait and switch portion I understand and I totally agree with BAR. Moreover my upbringing tells me that practices such as these are not only illegal, they are wrong? Legally, morally and ethically wrong..............period. The part that alarms me is that, even though these stores were found guilty of actions that go against everything I know and everything I am, the bait and switch was not the only issue here. There were many references to unnecessary rotor refinishing, brake adjusting and brake cleaning. All of which I sell on a very regular basis. What constitutes necessary? If it is not written in the OE manual as a normal service procedure, does this mean they are unnecessary? I am sure I am not the only one who sometimes see OE engineers as misinformed brainiacs who, on their best day, would likely struggle to accomplish the tasks of an entry level automotive technician. We all know the importance of a brake fluid flush. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, which means it is prone to draw moisture at the same time copper ions wear from the brake lines and further contaminate the fluid. Replacing the fluid removes the infected fluid and restores fluid with the proper boiling point and helps to protect other brake components from damage. Look at your factory maintenance schedules. Not many require brake fluid flushes. The full article as presented by link on the Brake & Front End website cited instances of brake adjustments being performed on "automatically adjusting" brake systems, we all know how well those work! Brake cleaning? According to the authority's in California the worn material from brake shoes in and enclosed environment must magically disappear on its own. If it does not disappear could it not effect brake balance, efficiency and therefore motorist safety? Do you see where I am going here? Are any of us a official inspection or a undercover sting operation away from a situation that could spell reputation disaster?

Now before you ask,"who peed in this guys post toasties" or wonder if I may be the brother in law of Mr Glad, let me tell you my story.

On a Monday morning in Jan of 2009 I opened for business as normal at 8:00 in the morning. At 8:05 three gentlemen strolled through my door who looked like outside salesmen from any number of companies who have called on many of you through the years. I thought to myself, I must be pretty important to command the whole team, until the badges came out. The Environmental Protection Agency credentials sent a cold chill up my spine that I will never forget. These inspectors were visiting me, all the way from West Virginia on alleged violations of the clean air act. I was ready to fully cooperate. After grilling me for 7 hours, copying every one of my invoices for the prior 6 months (even rolled in their own copy machine) and inspecting my shop, warehouse, personal and employees vehicles, they left at 4:00 pm with the parting words, we will get back to you. Now, keep in mind they could not or would not tell me what they were looking for, why I was targeted or who made the allegations against my company. 2 weeks after the visit one inspector called and asked for a complete list of all the part numbers of catalytic converters I sell. I faxed that information requested and the wait continued. I spent the next few months wondering where we go from here? What do they think? Are they working up a case against me? Have they found nothing and just decided to drop it? Is there a period of time like a statute of limitations that has expired? The longer this continued the less I slept and the angrier I became. These people were questioning my integrity. For years I had hoped that some of my competitors would be caught for illegal activities and brought to justice. Now I was being accused of something, although I was unsure then then even what that something was. Finally, the last week of Sept 2009 The registered letter arrived. At least I would know the charges against me and prepare a defense. I opened the letter and found charges of 27 violations of the clean air act and the corresponding fine of 37K! However as a first time offender I was eligible for a expedited settlement of 14K if I paid in 30 days (kinda seems like extortion to me). What were the violations? 27 counts of selling used catalytic converters.

Now is where things get really interesting. I call the big wig listed on the registered letter and after allowing him to conference call another agent and a supervisor the 4 of us try to decipher this little fiasco. I ask for the numbers of the invoices that show the violations. "I don't have that information" was the reply. "Then how am I to defend myself if I don't know what led you to this conclusion"? This is when the supervisor chimed in and informed me that the invoices in question had 3 part numbers of converters that she was not familiar with and " I am the aftermarket converter expert here" she said and "if those numbers do not exist then they must be concocted to hide non compliant units" WOW, that makes no sense at all was my response. I asked what I had to do to assure those numbers were in fact fully compliant part numbers and EPA certified units? The first agent said "fax me a letter from the manufacturer stating that they are EPA compliant and invoices from your supplier showing your purchases of those same numbers and quantities during the 6 months included in the investigation and we will consider the evidence.

I called Carsound \ Magnaflow and asked for the information the EPA requested which was faxed to me the next morning. i then faxed that letter along with my supplier invoices showing the purchase of those 27 units in a 7 month period to the EPA on a Thursday morning and waited again until Wed of the next week. The caller ID showed US Gov and a out of town area code. Finally a response, and the conversation went like this. "Well Mr Hogan, it seems there has been a mistake on the part of our contracted inspectors. The information you provided clears up this matter and we now consider the investigation closed.

I hope my story makes each and every one of you think about your processes and procedures. I certainly hope that cleaning and adjusting the rear brake shoes on a customers vehicle does not bring "the man" after me again. Mine was a little different scenario that that of the Midas shops but look how the experience turned my life upside down for 10 months. Many sleepless nights that I hope to never experience again.

Thanks for suffering through this lengthy post. Good luck and a prosperous 2010 to you all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK guys, I have to admit that this story not only alarms me, it makes me more than a little PO'd. This is liable to get a little long winded but please bear with me while I explain.

The bait and switch portion I understand and I totally agree with BAR. Moreover my upbringing tells me that practices such as these are not only illegal, they are wrong? Legally, morally and ethically wrong..............period. The part that alarms me is that, even though these stores were found guilty of actions that go against everything I know and everything I am, the bait and switch was not the only issue here. There were many references to unnecessary rotor refinishing, brake adjusting and brake cleaning. All of which I sell on a very regular basis. What constitutes necessary? If it is not written in the OE manual as a normal service procedure, does this mean they are unnecessary? I am sure I am not the only one who sometimes see OE engineers as misinformed brainiacs who, on their best day, would likely struggle to accomplish the tasks of an entry level automotive technician. We all know the importance of a brake fluid flush. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, which means it is prone to draw moisture at the same time copper ions wear from the brake lines and further contaminate the fluid. Replacing the fluid removes the infected fluid and restores fluid with the proper boiling point and helps to protect other brake components from damage. Look at your factory maintenance schedules. Not many require brake fluid flushes. The full article as presented by link on the Brake & Front End website cited instances of brake adjustments being performed on "automatically adjusting" brake systems, we all know how well those work! Brake cleaning? According to the authority's in California the worn material from brake shoes in and enclosed environment must magically disappear on its own. If it does not disappear could it not effect brake balance, efficiency and therefore motorist safety? Do you see where I am going here? Are any of us a official inspection or a undercover sting operation away from a situation that could spell reputation disaster?

Now before you ask,"who peed in this guys post toasties" or wonder if I may be the brother in law of Mr Glad, let me tell you my story.

On a Monday morning in Jan of 2009 I opened for business as normal at 8:00 in the morning. At 8:05 three gentlemen strolled through my door who looked like outside salesmen from any number of companies who have called on many of you through the years. I thought to myself, I must be pretty important to command the whole team, until the badges came out. The Environmental Protection Agency credentials sent a cold chill up my spine that I will never forget. These inspectors were visiting me, all the way from West Virginia on alleged violations of the clean air act. I was ready to fully cooperate. After grilling me for 7 hours, copying every one of my invoices for the prior 6 months (even rolled in their own copy machine) and inspecting my shop, warehouse, personal and employees vehicles, they left at 4:00 pm with the parting words, we will get back to you. Now, keep in mind they could not or would not tell me what they were looking for, why I was targeted or who made the allegations against my company. 2 weeks after the visit one inspector called and asked for a complete list of all the part numbers of catalytic converters I sell. I faxed that information requested and the wait continued. I spent the next few months wondering where we go from here? What do they think? Are they working up a case against me? Have they found nothing and just decided to drop it? Is there a period of time like a statute of limitations that has expired? The longer this continued the less I slept and the angrier I became. These people were questioning my integrity. For years I had hoped that some of my competitors would be caught for illegal activities and brought to justice. Now I was being accused of something, although I was unsure then then even what that something was. Finally, the last week of Sept 2009 The registered letter arrived. At least I would know the charges against me and prepare a defense. I opened the letter and found charges of 27 violations of the clean air act and the corresponding fine of 37K! However as a first time offender I was eligible for a expedited settlement of 14K if I paid in 30 days (kinda seems like extortion to me). What were the violations? 27 counts of selling used catalytic converters.

Now is where things get really interesting. I call the big wig listed on the registered letter and after allowing him to conference call another agent and a supervisor the 4 of us try to decipher this little fiasco. I ask for the numbers of the invoices that show the violations. "I don't have that information" was the reply. "Then how am I to defend myself if I don't know what led you to this conclusion"? This is when the supervisor chimed in and informed me that the invoices in question had 3 part numbers of converters that she was not familiar with and " I am the aftermarket converter expert here" she said and "if those numbers do not exist then they must be concocted to hide non compliant units" WOW, that makes no sense at all was my response. I asked what I had to do to assure those numbers were in fact fully compliant part numbers and EPA certified units? The first agent said "fax me a letter from the manufacturer stating that they are EPA compliant and invoices from your supplier showing your purchases of those same numbers and quantities during the 6 months included in the investigation and we will consider the evidence.

I called Carsound \ Magnaflow and asked for the information the EPA requested which was faxed to me the next morning. i then faxed that letter along with my supplier invoices showing the purchase of those 27 units in a 7 month period to the EPA on a Thursday morning and waited again until Wed of the next week. The caller ID showed US Gov and a out of town area code. Finally a response, and the conversation went like this. "Well Mr Hogan, it seems there has been a mistake on the part of our contracted inspectors. The information you provided clears up this matter and we now consider the investigation closed.

I hope my story makes each and every one of you think about your processes and procedures. I certainly hope that cleaning and adjusting the rear brake shoes on a customers vehicle does not bring "the man" after me again. Mine was a little different scenario that that of the Midas shops but look how the experience turned my life upside down for 10 months. Many sleepless nights that I hope to never experience again.

Thanks for suffering through this lengthy post. Good luck and a prosperous 2010 to you all.

 

 

I'm glad to hear you cleared your name and reputation with the paperwork trail. Good job there. But, you left one unanswered question... this one bothers me... WHO CALLED YOU IN??? I don't have a problem with the EPA, but I always run into problems with irate customers. Most of my general repairs are electrical in nature (Auto electric specialist) and I've seen people get bent because of the lack of understanding of how the systems work or over the cost of the repairs.

But, I am always looking over my shoulder for that "crack'd pot" customer that has set his vengance on myself or my company....

So.... did ya find out who it was... or have you started to look over your shoulder too....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow that is a scary story. What do you think prompted this scenario? What if you were like me and just bought a load of inventory from a shop that closed. There is no paperwork on those converters.

 

 

 

We were never told for sure but when I originally asked the 3 investigators, one of them said "the EPA has people who surf the web looking for violators"

I have a website where I sell performance exhaust components for GM Supercharged V6 cars. All 27 violations were catalytic converters part numbers we sell on our site. That why we think the website was target but it makes no sense due to the fact that I am not the largest player in this market . Nor do I get the exposure this competitor does. However if he were to alert the EPA he would be self reporting because he sells off road pipes which I don't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Here is another automotive group in trouble over fraudulent practices.

 

NorthJersey.com: Lodi car repair shop paying $250,000 to settle suit

 

 

Unblievable... the first thing that strikes me is that the unsupecting customer would even think they needed such things as "pwr steering flush" and the second is that the business would try it.

 

All of this sounds... again (broken record) of a bait and switch. Have you ever noticed the TV ads for ... lets say... eye glasses...?? "Buy one get one free... or the $29.95 special" When you get there you find out it's one shelf of eye wear.. but only half of that shelf, and only the ones that are on the left side of that half shelf...... "But, since you're here... let me show you the latest styles... oh, they are only $399.00"

 

Call me old fashion, call me frugal... but one thing that pisses me off more than anything else... is the old "reduced price on an item to get you in the door deal..." Always thought that was a crude way of getting them in the door... but... IT DOES WORK... that to me is the unbelievable part... So, I guess, if ya wanna sell power steering flushes, and some "dumb A hole" wants to pay for it... well, let the world keep turning... no wonder I'm so dizzy... BTW... I'll avoid shopping where they offer such crude methods of advertising.... just to let you know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gonzo, the issue in this case was they were offering and selling services they did not have the equipment to perform not that they were offering those services like P.S. flushes. As far as the effectiveness or need for P.S. flushes I would differ with you. Now I grew up in the country. There was a stoplight in my home county and you had to drill for electricity. biggrin.gif Nobody ever did a P.S. flush and honestly I have never done a P.S. flush on any of my own vehicles. However, I have seen as you have P.S. systems with very nasty P.S. fluid and that cannot be good for P.S. pumps or steering racks. In addition on multiple occassions we have cured both noisy and stiff power steering system by doing a flush and adding additive. Thus, we in good faith offer P.S. flushes but we don't push them hard. We believe that P.S. flushes are worth doing although not critcial as a maintenance item. We often offer a flush as a first step to attempt to cure P.S. noise rather than pump replacement and we also offer P.S. flushes when the fluid is dirty.

 

 

I guess it didn't "write" down like I meant it to be. Not that I'm against PS flushes... no I'm not... I meant it as a lost leader.

These guys that do the farm out type work is nothing new to me. Several years ago I had this guy drive by my shop... hit his brakes hard, come running into my shop and tells me "that's my truck, what are you doing with it"

That's when I found out it was farmed out to me from another shop... and they didn't tell the customer... and he found out they were only raising the price to him... and it would have been cheaper to have brought it straight to my shop instead.

 

Sorry for the confusion... Gonzo.... sometimes... I'm just dizzy... (then there was yesterday... spent the day at the dentist...yuk, root canal... thank god for meds...LOL)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also think the dealer used this situation to their advantage and to discredit Jiffy Lube. Another case where the writier does not get enough information to write a fair and balanced story.

 

Your situation with the O2 sensor is totally different, those thing happen.

 

 

I believe you have a point Joe, about the Dealer making the other guy look bad. I've been doing this for a long time and that situation is so so so typical. Everybody is trying to gain the trust of the consumer and usually at the defacing of another competitor. I'm not sticking up for Jiffy Lube... I'm sticking up for me... the independent market... there is either not enough info or the writer hasn't got all his facts straight. Anytime there is a dispute between two shops... I think an 3rd one should step in as the arbitrator... not some writer or the owner... niether of which are professionals.

 

It ends up back to my usual bitch.... EDUCATE THE CUSTOMER BUT DON'T FORGET TO EDUCATE THE TECH...!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         5 comments
      I recently spoke with a friend of mine who owns a large general repair shop in the Midwest. His father founded the business in 1975. He was telling me that although he’s busy, he’s also very frustrated. When I probed him more about his frustrations, he said that it’s hard to find qualified technicians. My friend employs four technicians and is looking to hire two more. I then asked him, “How long does a technician last working for you.” He looked puzzled and replied, “I never really thought about that, but I can tell that except for one tech, most technicians don’t last working for me longer than a few years.”
      Judging from personal experience as a shop owner and from what I know about the auto repair industry, I can tell you that other than a few exceptions, the turnover rate for technicians in our industry is too high. This makes me think, do we have a technician shortage or a retention problem? Have we done the best we can over the decades to provide great pay plans, benefits packages, great work environments, and the right culture to ensure that the techs we have stay with us?
      Finding and hiring qualified automotive technicians is not a new phenomenon. This problem has been around for as long as I can remember. While we do need to attract people to our industry and provide the necessary training and mentorship, we also need to focus on retention. Having a revolving door and needing to hire techs every few years or so costs your company money. Big money! And that revolving door may be a sign of an even bigger issue: poor leadership, and poor employee management skills.
      Here’s one more thing to consider, for the most part, technicians don’t leave one job to start a new career, they leave one shop as a technician to become a technician at another shop. The reasons why they leave can be debated, but there is one fact that we cannot deny, people don’t quit the company they work for, they usually leave because of the boss or manager they work for.
      Put yourselves in the shoes of your employees. Do you have a workplace that communicates, “We appreciate you and want you to stay!”
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By carmcapriotto
      The Weekly Blitz is brought to you by our friends over at Shop Marketing Pros. If you want to take your shop to the next level, you need great marketing. Shop Marketing Pros does top-tier marketing for top-tier shops.
      Click here to learn more about Top Tier Marketing by Shop Marketing Pros and schedule a demo:https://shopmarketingpros.com/chris/
      Check out their podcast here: https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/
      If you would like to join their private Facebook group go here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/autorepairmarketingmastermind
      In this podcast episode, Coach Chris Cotton from Auto Fix Auto Shop Coaching highlights the significance of always saying yes to customers in the auto repair industry. He recounts two examples where service advisors faced challenges in agreeing to customer requests. Cotton stresses the importance of customer satisfaction and the delicate balance of agreeing to customer demands without making unrealistic promises.
      Saying Yes to Customers (00:02:36) Importance of prioritizing customer satisfaction and finding ways to say yes instead of no.
      Handling Customer Requests (00:03:45) Addressing an instance where a service advisor struggled to manage customer expectations and deliver on promises.
      Customer Service Skills (00:05:54) Emphasizing the need to take care of the customer, manage expectations, and avoid overpromising while saying yes.
      Saying Yes and Managing Expectations (00:10:11) Discussing the importance of saying yes to customers while managing expectations and not overpromising.
      1. Importance of not saying no to customers in the auto repair business
      2. Instances of a service advisor struggling to say yes to customers
      3. Emphasizing the need to prioritize customer satisfaction
      4.Managing expectations while saying yes to customers
      5.Not overpromising to customers
      Quotes:
      Coach Chris Cotton', '00:06:54', "How would you like it if you were leaving town in 24 hours and somebody said, 'Oh, you can't take your car because we can't finish it up'? It's just not the right place to be in."
      'Coach Chris Cotton', '00:09:14', "The customer doesn't care about any of that; the customer just wants to know if you can help them or not."
      'Coach Chris Cotton', '00:12:16', "If they're in front of you unexpectedly, say yes, smile, and be like, 'Oh, I'm so glad, Mrs. Johnson, that you're here today. I haven't seen you in a while. Absolutely, we'll take care of your crisis for you.'"
       
      Connect with Chris:
       
      [email protected]
      Phone: 940.400.1008
      www.autoshopcoaching.com
      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
      AutoFixAutoShopCoachingYoutube: https://bit.ly/3ClX0ae
       
      #autofixautoshopcoaching #autofixbeautofixing #autoshopprofits #autoshopprofit #autoshopprofitsfirst #autoshopleadership #autoshopmanagement #autorepairshopcoaching #autorepairshopconsulting #autorepairshoptraining #autorepairshop #autorepair #serviceadvisor #serviceadvisorefficiency #autorepairshopmarketing #theweeklyblitz #autofix #shopmarketingpros #autofixautoshopcoachingbook
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Changing The Industry
      Episode 152 - A Blueprint for Financial Independence in Auto Repair Shops with Rick White of 180Biz
    • By carmcapriotto
      It's time to find the hidden costs of 'busyness' in auto repair shops. It's not just about the work you do; it's about the work you're actually getting paid for. Measuring technician productivity is crucial - because if you're not measuring it, you can't manage it. It's a wake-up call for shops everywhere to stop leaving money on the table. Bill Haas, Haas Performance Consulting, Bill’s previous episodes HERE. Murray Voth, RPM Training. Listen to Murray’s previous episodes HERE Maylan Newton, ESI- Educational Seminars Institute. Maylan’s previous Episodes HERE Show Notes: The Importance of Shop Productivity (00:01:41) Discussion on the significance of measuring productivity and ensuring work is paid for. Challenges in Understanding Business Numbers (00:05:39) Discussion on the lack of understanding of business numbers and pricing strategies in the automotive industry. Implementing Time Clock Management (00:09:12) The importance of implementing time clock management and its impact on shop productivity. Setting Expectations and Accountability (00:11:14) The need for setting expectations and holding employees accountable for their performance. Challenges in Coaching and Accountability (00:12:25) The difficulty in coaching individuals who resist change and accountability in their business practices. Labor Rates and Coaching (00:18:40) Discussion on the impact of labor rates and the value of coaching in the automotive industry. Comparing Labor Rates (00:20:17) Debate on the practice of comparing labor rates and the importance of charging enough to pay employees. Technician Interviews and Billing (00:21:50) Perspective on technician interviews and billing practices, including misconceptions and lack of understanding. Business Education and Financial Planning (00:26:01) Importance of business education, financial planning, and understanding where the money goes in an automotive shop. Year-End Spending and Tax Strategies (00:27:16) Discussion on year-end spending, tax strategies, and the significance of paying fair taxes. The value of pricing (00:35:42) Discussion on the importance of presenting value over price in a competitive marketplace. The market for different pricing strategies (00:39:18) Highlighting the existence of markets for both top-tier pricing and lowest cost options, with a comparison to the tool market. The challenge of selling value (00:40:10) Debating the myth of offering better value and emphasizing the importance of growth and selling maintenance services. Defining fair pricing and value (00:40:40) Challenging the concept of fair pricing and discussing the perception of value in the eye of the beholder. Improving customer communication and value presentation (00:41:07) Emphasizing the importance of showcasing the quality of services, such as brake jobs, and the value they provide to customers. Challenges in selling diagnostic services (00:43:00) Discussion on the difficulties in selling diagnostic services and the need to shift from focusing on hours to tangible products and value. Efficiency in customer interactions and value communication (00:46:12) Emphasizing the need for efficient information gathering and value communication to customers during the intake process. The need to change industry mindset (00:52:07) Encouraging a shift in mindset within the automotive repair industry to drive change and success. The shop's transformation (00:54:08) Discussion on the positive changes and experiences after implementing changes in the shop. Clientele shift (00:55:00) The impact of changes on the clientele and the feedback received from customers. The value of preaching (00:56:06) Exploring the significance of preaching and the positive outcomes it brings in terms of leadership and company growth. Reward and challenges (00:57:00) Acknowledging the challenges and rewards of making significant changes in the business.
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA TRACS NAPA TRACS will move your shop into the SMS fast lane with onsite training and six days a week of support and local representation. Find NAPA TRACS on the Web at http://napatracs.com/ Connect with the Podcast -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter (X): https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections        
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Our Sponsors

×
×
  • Create New...