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Hello All, Complete Newb here


TigerPrideAuto

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Hello Guys and Gals,

 

My name is Brad, I'm an ASE certified (all but A3) Technician currently in the process of starting my own repair shop in SW Missouri.

 

I'm 24 years old and have been in the business professionally since 2002. I started out at a local Ford Dealer doing the quick lube thing. I've been dreaming of opening my own shop since the ripe old age of about 12. :D

 

I found an investor that is willing to work with me on the terms (we're actually hashing out the re-payment plan tomorrow) and I'm here to look for info and learn from people in the business.

 

I'm in a great position, as the building I'm going to operate in is already owned by my Father. I'm going to get use of the 1450 sq. ft shop free of charge for 6 months. I plan on starting small, offering low-cost lube and maintenance service, then expanding to full service domestic and Asian import diag and repair within (hopefully) 1-3 years.

 

Thats pretty much my story, and i'm open to any advice or comments you all may have. I love discussing cars and cant wait to join in and participate in this community.

 

Thank you all for this site. Its truly amazing. :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Welcome aboard Brad! It's always nice to see someone opening up a business. I think that the circumstances you have (father owning the building, 6 months rent free, etc) will help you launch a successful business. I would for the first six months, while yoru overhead is low:

 

Market, Market, Market your business!

 

1. Find a service to target zip codes around your shop and send out a mailer. Use the money you would have for rent.

2. Print flyers and see if other local businesses can display them.

3. Find new customers and take everyone in.

4. Get a hold od a solid management system, ie Mitchell, R.O.Writer, etc.

5. Collect ALL e-mails from customers...(free mailings down the road, newsletters, etc)

6. Build a basic website, you can find them for $99 a quarter. Subnit that site to search engines, yellow pages online, online directories liek Google, Yahoo, etc.

7. Offer an intro LOF price to get people in the door.

 

Basically, in six months, use your money and tiime to build yoru business for the coming years. Get yoru customers and wow them with professionalism and make it easy for them to want to use you again.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Congrats and welcome to autoshop owner.com You and I have a lot in common. I am 16 years old and have always dreamed of opening my own shop. My father also has an auto shop that i will be taking over in a few years. I cant wait, but i was wondering what automotive school you went to and how long does it take to become ASE certified. Well Thank You, and Good Luck with the shop!

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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