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bantar

ADAS - What's required?

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@CAR_AutoReports created an article about ADAS, but I can't reply there.  It was a good article.   Thank you.  Starting a new topic to discuss this in more detail since it won't let me respond there.

I've started asking around to see if the Mobile Diagnostics guys are adding ADAS to their mobile services and so far, I've found no one, but also haven't looked very hard either.    At a minimum, we all need to be able to recognize when ADAS is impacted and know whether to proceed with a service or not, if we are unequipped to tackle the next step.

I do have a few questions / observations / :

  1. With the complexity of these procedures, does anyone have a feel for how the dealers are pricing / handling ADAS reprograms? 
  2. In looking at this as a service offering, assuming one has room, I wonder about the following:
  • What prices would the market bear for such services?
  • You mention that you are getting paid for documentation.  Sounds like the ADAS services are time and materials charging.   Your car didn't program in the typical 45 minute drive cycle, so you are charged extra.    I think I remember reading about some complex procedures that were in the 10 hour range?   Any comment on typical job sizes?  
  • Lastly on charging, I can see people throwing fits on such "frivolity" (anything you don't fully understand must not be important).   "If it's that much, time to get rid of the car!!!!"
  • Looks like this could be a single specialty shop offering - B2B only.
  • Are there generic tool kits that work with multiple car lines or is it one tool kit per line?
  • Any idea of the types of such kits and their costs?  You mentioned $20K toolkit.  
  • If access to OE Information is mandatory this may also impact which car lines are selected (as one may not want many subscriptions, even if temporary)
  • Can we perform an ADAS impactful repair, but then sublet to the dealer for the ADAS reprogram (or other local shop)?  Is this a good strategy or not? 

As of today, I've seen a number of cars with these systems, but have not performed any services which would impact them.

 

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