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tyrguy

Shop near Fort Myers Beach

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Okay, so it's been 6 months now and I've still not had one regret about selling my business and becoming a landlord. Although I'm only required to come in 2 days a week I still come in 5 unless I'm out of town. In 6 months when my 2 day obligation is fulfilled I don't know what I'll do. Anyway, recently I bought a condo in Fort Myers Beach and will be spending quite a bit of time down there. I am driving my 2002 Mini Cooper down to leave as my "southern" car. It's only got 55k miles on it but I had the guys here at the shop go through it, change all fluids, new brakes rotor and calipers, new battery, etc. So I'm sure it will be okay for a while. However, at some point it will need service down there and here's the thing: Because my dad had a gas station and then a repair shop for 25 years, and then I had my own for 39 years, I've NEVER had to take a vehicle anywhere for service. It will be a new experience for me. Any of you guys have a shop in the Fort Myers, Fort Myers Beach, Naples area that could take care of my car service? For the most part most of the members of this forum seem like guys I would want to do business with.

 

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