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OFFICE SCANNERS

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I want to start 1st with scanning our invoices into the computer and doing away with paper.  I don't know where to start and how to get started.  Any ideas.  It has to be fast and efficient.  Any body using them and how it works.  From looking on the Internet I see it might take a two piece of equipment.  Not sure                                           

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