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Finally opening the shop

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After years of work to get to this point, we are finally opening the doors to my new shop on Monday.   I did a small friends and family test on Friday.  We stubbed our toes on all procedures but the actual shop work.   It was horrible, but a great learning experience.  Most issues were procedural in nature, so this weekend was procedure repair.   We really weren't ready to open, but it needed to happen.   Still not ready on all fronts.  My website is built, but awaiting my detailed review to go online.  It'll happen in the next day or so.    We're still buying shop tools.   Many are in, but I wanted to let my staff be part of the tool choices.  (Yes, we're going to have to pare back some of their big wish list).

Hiring is still ongoing.  I had my 3 critical positions covered for a while now, but I still have more left to hire.

I chose Protractor as my SMS.  I'm mostly happy with this decision.  My biggest gripe is that the software is unforgiving of mistakes and new users make many mistakes.   I now need to learn how to undo my mistakes so that the accounting part remains accurate. 

Today, my entire computer network went down and it took us over 2 hours to get it back online.  Next on the list is to practice recovery procedures.

One of my major marketing spend items was to be on a busy corner.  It appears that this may indeed work out for us.   We serviced about 9 cars on Friday and turned away about 15 drive-up customers.   Have 1 appointment booked for tomorrow.   Wish me luck!  

 

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