Quantcast
Jump to content


    • You can post now and register later. Already registered? sign in now to post with your account.
    • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

        Only 75 emoji are allowed.

      ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

      ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

      ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


      Once you submit your question, a new topic will be created for you in our forums. Our moderators may move your topic to a more suitable forum category if one exists. Members will see your topic and be able to respond to your question.

    • This will not be shown to other users.
totalautocare

Ready industry enhancements.

Recommended Posts

Read something that got me revved up!

 

A discussion regarding the laborforce shortage. Here are some of my thoughts to create a win/win for a better experience in our trade for employees, employers and the general public.

 

I'd love to hear your ideas as well.

 

1. Employers and employees can both conduct themselves in a more professional manner to increase the perceived value of the public.

 

2. Less technical, more "people oriented" sales and leadership staff.

 

3. Simple and fair performance based pay structures. Ex. Fair hourly + good production incentive.

 

4. Work/Life balance. Labor force goes home at 5. Saturday's optional. No Sundays, ever.

 

5. Cut the heads off the premadonna's in the shop! Teamwork makes the dream work and if you have a problematic high performer killing the shop culture.. Give everyone else the gift of a better place to work and let that turkey go!

 

6. "Make them hate you on the front end". Be up front about everything! Then there's nothing to hide and no counter negotiations to deal with. This is what we do and how we'll do it and What it means for you mr. Customer.

 

7. Train in your clients: "This is how we do it here" and help them understand what to expect and sign for it. Ex. Mr. Customer, we'll need to run tests to determine the probable causes, the cost of these tests will be x. If you accept, please sign here. Now nobody has to ask the tech to take one for the team to get the sale.

 

7. Everybody needs to adopt the philosophy: "No gimmicks, games or drama! Don't deal it, don't accept it."

 

Sent from my SM-N900P using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Topics

    • By DiscoDave
      I am helping a growing business to be more efficient.  As part of this, I am looking at a service to maintain our general hardware and supplies.  The shop needs a manager as the owner is too involved with the shop - and rightly so as he is highly respected in his arena.  That's another discussion.
      As he moved into a larger facility and hired more people. I'm working on efficiencies.  The current goal is to have common hardware an supplies on hand, always.  I am looking for a service to handle this.  I have spoken with Rogo, Fastenal and Kimball Midwest.   Any other suggestions?  Runs to the hardware store are costly...
      TIA,
      Dave
    • By Joe Marconi
      First, let me clarify one thing: I AM NOT THE EXPERT.  But there are  things about the PPP that concern me. Such as this quote fron the SBA:  "Forgeven amounts will be considerded income for federal tax purposes." So, if you get a forgiven loan in the amount of 100,000- that will be added as income? 
      And, the fact that we need to rehire to full staff by June 30, 2020.  So, in an area like mine where we don't expect business to return for 6 months or longer, I need to rehire to full staff, with 60% of sales down, use the SBA PPP to make payroll????   This is insane economics.
      I do not want to rain on anyone's parade here. Being in NY, I got hit early and got hit hard.  We are going on more than 8 weeks with little to no business.  I too need financial help.
      Look, the point is take it slow and get all the information from a pro.  This is what I need to do too.  Please get the advise from your banker, your attorney, financial advisor and your accoutant.
      The only  true way out of this is for business to return to normal, through sales and revenue.
       
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      My Thoughts on the Coronavirus and Business
      In my 40 years in business, I have lived through many economic downturns. From the stock market crash of the late 1980’s, the housing bust of 1990’s, the tragic event of 911 and the great recession of 2008. This is different.  The fears and the realities of the coronavirus has affected us all.  And some areas of the country have been hit harder than others.  In all other situations, I fought like hell to make a difference and beat the circumstances.  Again, this is different.
      I am not an alarmist, not a defeatist and I do not get sucked into the sensationalism of the press. Just today, I heard a sports announcer on a talk radio show advise her listeners to stay at home, don’t go to work, don’t go to the movies, don’t go out of the house and isolate yourself from other people. Is this rational?  I can’t do that. 
      I am an automotive shop owner. What I do matters to my family and the community. I…WE….need to be there to ensure that the doctors, nurses, police, public officials and everyone else has their transportation ready to perform. Stay home? Us? Is that an option?
      But again…this is different.  This afternoon, I was getting ready to go to Church;  4:00pm Mass, when my wife got an alert that Church as been canceled.  Wait; let me say this again real slow…Church… has…. been…canceled.
      Fear has a way of eating at the fabric of our rational being.  I fully understand the reality of what is happening. This virus will take people’s lives. But, do we run away in the face of a threat?  Is this who we are?  What do we do? Close our businesses for a few weeks? A month or two? How many of us can afford that?  We all know the answer to that question.
      As automotive shop owners, technicians, service advisors and all the other valuable employees of this great profession, we need to take the proper precautions. Do all you can to protect yourself and your family. If you decide to continue to operate your shop during this challenging time, have a meeting with all your employees. Take the proper steps to protect yourself, your employees and your customers.
      Business may get ugly for some.  My company has taken a  40% drop in business the past three weeks, directly contributed to the coronavirus outbreak.
      I write this to tell you how I feel; not to decide for anyone what to do.  I will not force my employees to do anything they feel would put themselves or their families in harm’s way.  For me, I intend to fight. I will take care of myself, take care of my family. But there are too many people depending on what I do, and way too may years behind me to hunker down and wait this out.
      Stay safe, stay healthy. Take this situation serious. But please don’t give up. We will prevail and we will get through this together.  We are the hardest working, most resilient, toughest people on the planet.
      Let’s show the world and this virus who we are!
    • By Joe Marconi
      What’s wrong with my employees? Why don’t they do what I ask of them? It’s the same thing every day.  I say one thing, they do another. It seems as if I am the only person who knows what to do around here.  
      Does any of this sound familiar? Have you said these words, or a variation of these words, from time to time? If so, you’re not alone. Getting people to follow policy or a new marketing strategy sometimes feels as if you are trying to move the earth off its axis.  
      People in high levels of authority are well-aware of the need to get things done. Each member of their team plays an integral part in the success or failure of the organization. In your shop, you are the authority: you are the shop owner. You know that the responsibility of attaining success directly rests on your shoulders. This is a weight you carry around with you each day. 
      Eventually, if your efforts don't attain the results you need to run a successful business, you begin to look around to find out what’s causing the problem. And the tendency is to assign blame. All too often, you find that your employees are not all pulling in the same direction. And you determine that this is the cause of your problems. The following may not sit well with you, but if most of your employees are not engaged and not performing up to your expectations, it’s probably not their fault. You need to take a long hard look in the mirror. The fault may lie with management, and that means you. 
      Assigning blame is destructive. It keeps our focus directed in the wrong areas. This is not to say we can never have a bad employee. But, if we focus on seeking blame, we are directing our attention from where our focus should be; and that’s accepting the responsibility to correct what’s happening and make the necessary changes. 
      In order to really get things done and achieve personal success and the personal success of your employees, it takes the cooperation of each team member. Getting people to work as a unified team involves commitment, not compliance. Compliance is demanding people to do something. And they will—but only up to a certain point and only for a certain period of time. What you need from your employees is not compliance; you need commitment. 
      Surveys have shown that the majority of employees in most businesses are not engaged at work and the primary reason is that most employees don’t know the overall goals and vision of the company. And they also don’t know what’s expected of them. Employees are largely left to react to their situations during the day; never really having a clear understanding of how their role contributes to their success and the success of the company. 
      A business team is no different than a sports team. Every member needs to know the objective and goals. Imagine the coach of a football team who does not let the quarterback—or the other players— know what the play is? He simply tells the players to get out on the field and perform. After all, the players are well-trained, highly capable and all professionals. Shouldn’t they know what to do to win?  And when they fail to win, the coach ends up blaming the players. Is this a ridiculous analogy? It may be, but this is what happens every day in shops across the country.  
      Your best employees don’t want to fail. They don’t intentionally ignore what you want from them. It’s more likely that they really may not know what you expect from them. Employees need to know exactly what is expected of them and they need to be motivated and inspired to perform their best. However, the only way your employees can perform at their best is for each of them to know what the company goals are. In other words, what is our overall objective and how we, as a team, are going to achieve it.  
      Each employee also needs to know that when the business wins, they do, too. When employees realize that achieving the company goals is also aligned with achieving their personal goals, you have commitment. And commitment equates to success. 
      Communicate the goals of the company often. Communicate what success looks like and how we are going to attain it. Create a workplace where the goals of the individual are aligned with the goals of the company. If things get off track, just look in the mirror. If you want to blame someone, you might want to start with yourself.  
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on December 3rd, 2019
       


      View full article
    • By Hands On
      I need to find some employees fast and I am having no luck, anyone willing to help me write an advertisement or help me with postings, over the phone or through e-mail, please let me know.
      Just found this, not feeling good about this.
      https://www.indeed.com/forum/job/automotive-technician/can-t-do-it-anymore/t459836


  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...