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Enough About Pricing. What About Value?


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There are quite a few threads about pricing but I think it might be better to shift that discussion to value.  How do you add value for your customers?  For example, we have a very clean waiting room with coffee, wifi, nice music etc...  We also, answer the phone in the happiest way possible, we use tablets for inspections, we vacuum the front footwells for all oil changes, we have demo parts to help educate customers and we have a 3yr 36k warranty.  Recently I've been trying to dream up ways to add even more value so I can compete hard on what I deliver.  For example, I just added a 20 year master tech, I thought I could vacuum every car and leave a thank you note on the dash.

What are you doing to add value?  What additional value are you adding that I'm not doing?  I would love to borrow some ideas if you are willing to share.

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