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Alex

Recent WordPress vulnerability used to deface 1.5 million pages

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There are so many websites powered by wordpress, including some of the ones posted by our members. Please make sure you or your webmaster patch or update your sites to the latest version. I often see outdated wordpress sites that are never updated in fear of breaking the styling and theme. It is critical to keep web 2.0 sites up to date.

 

More info:

Recent WordPress vulnerability used to deface 1.5 million pages

Over One Million WordPress Sites Defaced

 

It's easy to see if you are running a wordpress site (as long as the admin panel has not been moved) just append /wp-admin/ to your domain name. Example: yoursite.com/wp-admin/

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