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Joe Marconi

Take your time hiring technicians and service advisors and have a plan

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Too many shop owners go into hire-crisis mode when they lose an employee. With no real plan, you ask everyone you know, put ads out, and research online sources. But all too often, you end up hiring the wrong person. Why? Desperation. You need to fill a position with someone.


Hiring is perhaps one of the most important aspects of running a business. You need to hire right, and that means taking your time, interview as many candidates as possible and look for reasons not to hire as much as reasons to hire someone.


​You also need a plan before you lose an employee. You need to adopt the strategy of recruiting. Constantly look for the top talent in your area and build your pipeline. Connect with this top talent and create a contact list. Maintain a relationship.


​With this strategy, when the time comes when you lose an employee, you will be in a better position to fill that spot with the right person.


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