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Mike Walter

Snap on credit llc unethical business practices

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Ok, here is the deal . I have been a loyal Snappie customer since 1984 and I have never experienced anything like what I experienced today with Snap on credit.

Long story short , a credit Manager made the decision that I defaulted on the lease agreement because I failed to notify them that I returned a piece of equipment ( WITH THE HELP OF THE LOCAL SNAP ON DEALER ).

 

So the Manager ( let's call him King ) made this decision from the input of all other parties involved ( some of the input was fraudulent, that's a big word and I would never use it unless I can back up using it, which I can ) and even though I had evidence to back up my claim that said I had no idea I was in default because the local Snap on Dealer was helping me with the return of the used equipment because he paid for it originally with his credit card.

 

My evidence consisted of emails and text messages that backed up my claim of not knowing to contact Snap on leasing when returing a piece of their equipment.

One text from the local dealer said once he got the credit back on his card he would either credit my truck account or cut me a check.

The text did not say anything about contacting Snap on credit.

 

BTW. I never missed a payment.

 

So when the King called the loan amount due full or otherwise they will come and get the equipment, so I told him to come and get it.

 

So be aware of Snap on credit fellow shop owners.

 

I will guarantee to all you guys and gals, if some young buck wants to play King with my lively hood it's time he learned a little life lesson.

 

I will keep you all updated.

 

Thank you.

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