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skm

acceptable brake line repair?

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I was doing a state inspection on a ford F150 this morning and I came across this. For Inspection we look for damage lines, copper lines, lines that are rusted and pitted, and compression fittings. In my 25 years inspecting I have failed tons of brake lines but never come a cross a repair like this. WOW !! Needless to say I wrote DO NOT DRIVE TRUCK UNSAFE ! on his inspection report and his receipt . Anyone seen this one before??post-3039-0-98881300-1445383426_thumb.jpg

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Edited by skm

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