Quantcast
Jump to content


Inspect or Diagnose?


Recommended Posts

When someone comes in with a symptom like "shake in xxx area" or a "grind when doing xxx" or "I just know something's wrong"..

 

Many times we get confused on what to charge. Diagnostic fee or inspection of a certain area.

 

How do you and your guys approach this?

 

Sent from my SM-N900P using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great Tire Deal

What color should you wear on every 3rd Wednesday of the even months :D. This is a question I believe we all struggle with and I just try to be as efficient as I can and take car of myself and customer. Here's an example of what I'm talking about last week.

 

I get a customer that brought in a Ford Ranger that he wanted replacement shackles put on the rear, diag ABS light and a noise in the front end. Normally this would be 2 separate diagnoses since it's 2 issues but it can easily be done by 1 30 min diag. I replaced the shackles then went for a test drive to ensure all was good and at the same time hooked up the scanner to monitor the wheel speed sensors. After hearing no squeak but find the wheel speed sensor had failed in the front I through the truck on the lift and pulled the tire to replace the wheel speed sensor. As the WD-40 was doing its job I shook down the front end and then replaced the wheel speed sensor and sent the vehicle on its way. I made a plan of action and then followed it and everyone won.

 

I know that there are a million different scenarios but IMHO if you just take a minute to create a plan of action it will make you more money and keep the customers costs down.

 

I

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We always inform the customer that our initial diagnosis is FREE. We spend 10-15 minutes diagnosing the car. After the 15 minutes we inform the customer of the findings and state that we have to perform a "Specialty Test" which is usually $45 to $75.

 

The main idea is to offer a free initial diagnosis over the phone to get the car to OUR shop.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We always inform the customer that our initial diagnosis is FREE. We spend 10-15 minutes diagnosing the car. After the 15 minutes we inform the customer of the findings and state that we have to perform a "Specialty Test" which is usually $45 to $75.

 

The main idea is to offer a free initial diagnosis over the phone to get the car to OUR shop.

 

 

Key is to get the people and cars through the door so IMO you are on the right track.

 

My 2c are that I wouldn't necessarily call it a "diagnosis" considering that you might lock yourself into a commitment in the customer's point of view. What we call it is a consultation and/or inspection of their concern. We make it clear to them that we want to give them some professional eyes on their problem before determining what the problem is or if further action needs to be taken to discover the problem/solution.

 

So in short we replace FREE with COMPLIMENTARY and INITIAL DIAGNOSIS with CONSULTATION and/or INSPECTION. It helps to differentiate your actual testing and diag fees.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Key is to get the people and cars through the door so IMO you are on the right track.

 

My 2c are that I wouldn't necessarily call it a "diagnosis" considering that you might lock yourself into a commitment in the customer's point of view. What we call it is a consultation and/or inspection of their concern. We make it clear to them that we want to give them some professional eyes on their problem before determining what the problem is or if further action needs to be taken to discover the problem/solution.

 

So in short we replace FREE with COMPLIMENTARY and INITIAL DIAGNOSIS with CONSULTATION and/or INSPECTION. It helps to differentiate your actual testing and diag fees.

But free is a key word to a lot of people. I agree with the rest of your statements.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

FREE = no value, COMPLIMENTARY = value. There is a reason why higher end services like a nice hotel or resort offer amenities complimentary rather than for free.

From Websters

 

Free : not costing any money : not held as a slave or prisoner : not physically held by something

 

Complimentary : expressing praise or admiration for someone or something : given for free

 

Free ... is used in so much advertising it is the key word to a lot of consumers. Look at every tool truck that comes in. Buy the latest whiz bang socket set and get a free 3/8 drive ratchet. Does the ratchet have value?

 

Maybe its my redneck up-bringing or the fact that I deal with so many Hispanics and their broken English. Complimentary would be coffee and donuts while you wait. Which has more value?

 

Sorry to get off topic

Edited by cdhowell
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess we can agree to disagree. I have effectively changed our culture and methods of doing business which include our use of the word complimentary vs free which has doubled out revenue and ARO in a matter of a calendar year. I will try almost anything that I feel might make a positive change to my business. In my experience the small change of free vs complimentary made a big difference.

 

Some other food for thought (from my own brain lol)... not only are you receiving something of value that is complimentary rather than free but you are also receiving something complimentary because YOU are valued as a client rather than offering free free free which is available to any person off the street. Not sure if that makes sense but it does it my head :)

 

If you like using the word free and its working for you by all means keep doing what keeps you successful!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By mikezat
      Hi! I got a bunch of engine and cabin filters - leftovers from my store. What's the best way to get rid off the inventory? eBay sales are slow and not an option due to the time it takes to list a filter and due to expensive cost of shipping.
      Many thanks in advance,
      Mike

    • By carmcapriotto
      The Weekly Blitz is brought to you by our friends over at Shop Marketing Pros. If you want to take your shop to the next level, you need great marketing. Shop Marketing Pros does top-tier marketing for top-tier shops.
      Click here to learn more about Top Tier Marketing by Shop Marketing Pros and schedule a demo:https://shopmarketingpros.com/chris/
      Check out their podcast here: https://autorepairmarketing.captivate.fm/
      If you would like to join their private Facebook group go here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/autorepairmarketingmastermind
      In this podcast episode, Chris Cotton from Auto Fix Auto Shop Coaching shares his expertise on team development within the auto repair industry. He advises against being the best person on your team, as it can hinder growth and lead to burnout. Instead, he offers strategies for building a capable team, such as hiring top talent, training, delegating, and fostering leadership. Chris emphasizes the benefits of collaboration, clear expectations, feedback, and a positive work environment. He also discusses transitioning to a team-focused approach and succession planning. The episode wraps up with Chris offering personalized advice and thanking the audience and sponsor, Shop Marketing Pros.
      The importance of not being the best person on your team (00:01:15) Chris discusses the negative impact of being the best person on your team and its limitations on business growth. The drawbacks of being the best person on your team (00:02:25) Chris outlines the negative consequences of being the best person on your team, including burnout, dependency, and stifled innovation. Building a stronger team (00:06:05) Chris provides practical tips for building a stronger team, including hiring the best, investing in training, and fostering leadership. Transitioning from being the best to building the best team (00:09:41) Chris offers steps to transition from being the best person on your team to building the best team, emphasizing the need for assessment, training, and succession planning.  
       
       
      Connect with Chris:
      [email protected]
      Phone: 940.400.1008
      www.autoshopcoaching.com
      Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
      AutoFixAutoShopCoachingYoutube: https://bit.ly/3ClX0ae
       
      #autofixautoshopcoaching #autofixbeautofixing #autoshopprofits #autoshopprofit #autoshopprofitsfirst #autoshopleadership #autoshopmanagement #autorepairshopcoaching #autorepairshopconsulting #autorepairshoptraining #autorepairshop #autorepair #serviceadvisor #serviceadvisorefficiency #autorepairshopmarketing #theweeklyblitz #autofix #shopmarketingpros #autofixautoshopcoachingbook
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • Water Proof And Self Adhesive
    • By nptrb

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.



  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...